Academic journal article Folk Music Journal

Trapped in Folklore? Studies in Music and Dance Tradition and Their Contemporary Transformations

Academic journal article Folk Music Journal

Trapped in Folklore? Studies in Music and Dance Tradition and Their Contemporary Transformations

Article excerpt

This publication, which originates in a conference held in Ljubljana in 2009 under the title 'What to Do with Folklore?', offers a selection of ten papers (plus an introduction), covering a range of topics. The connecting strand lies mostly in the way the articles address various aspects of what might loosely be called 'folk revivalism'. The practices under discussion include the contemporary Hungarian bagpipe revival; the use of folk song and dance at social events in a Slovenian village; the adoption of Balkan brass band music by Slovenian musicians; contemporary attitudes to morris and calw dancing; the revival of the revena custom -- roughly, a carnival feast for women, from which men, apart from a single musician, are excluded (or exclude themselves) -- in Serbia; the adoption of a late nineteenth-century composed tune, jcA Hrvatska ni propala', into the 'folk' repertoire. A further paper considers the performance of folk music by women in Slovenia and Kosovo as a deliberate form of self-expression and emancipation.

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A recurring concern seems to be the possibility that on the one hand, 'folklore' might be perceived as a static category, while on the other, acts of deliberate revivalism might have an element of 'folldorism', or artificially contrived 'fakelore', about them. …

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