Academic journal article Academy of Educational Leadership Journal

Marketing Department Chairs as Key Informants-The Role of Gender in Judging the Consequences of Student Market Orientation within AACSB Member Schools

Academic journal article Academy of Educational Leadership Journal

Marketing Department Chairs as Key Informants-The Role of Gender in Judging the Consequences of Student Market Orientation within AACSB Member Schools

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION AND LITERATURE REVIEW

Phillips (1981) suggests that key informant characteristics (such as gender) are among several factors that can impact variable measurement and "systematic sources of error" (p. 396), and that researchers should take note in attempting to measure organizational characteristics. Practitioners, in turn, should take note as they form strategy and make policy decisions based on studies that incorporate key informant judgments of organizational characteristics. The influence of gender on perception of professionals has been reported previously in numerous marketing studies. Gender, for example, has been found to affect managers' social orientation (Marz, Powers, and Queisser 2003), ethics judgment (Marta, Singhapakdi, and Kraft 2008; Lund 2008), and perceptions of sales force control tools (Bingham and Quigley 1995).

This study reports the results of a national survey of marketing department chairs at AACSB business schools. Part of a larger effort, the study is an extension of previous research by the authors () which indicated a significant moderating influence of key informant gender on the causal relationships between student market orientation components and selected consequence variables within AACSB member schools. In this study, we examine these causal relationships more thoroughly for key informant gender.

We use scales from Jaworski and Kohli (1993) to measure overall performance, esprit de corps, and organizational commitment (reworded somewhat for use within higher education). We use the Narver and Slater (1990) scale as reworded and employed by Hammond, Webster, and Harmon (2006) within higher education to measure the three components of student market orientation (customer orientation, competitor orientation, interfunctional coordination).

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Though part of a larger effort, the focus of this study is limited. As stated earlier, we further examine the influence of key informant gender on the relationships between student market orientation and three different performance measures within AACSB member schools, employing marketing department chairs as key informants. We split the respondents into two groups, male and female, and examine the responses from each group separately. As stated above, we know from previous research that certain of the causal relationships are significant overall, and that gender moderates those relationships.

The first two research objectives for this study are to identify the statistically significant causal relationships between the student market orientation components (customer orientation, competitor orientation, inter-functional coordination) and selected consequences (overall business school performance, esprit de corps, organizational commitment), as perceived by

(1) male chairs of marketing departments within AACSB member schools, and (2) female chairs of marketing departments within AACSB member schools. The third and fourth research objectives are to identify statistically significant correlations that may exist between the consequence variables (overall business school performance, esprit de corps, organizational commitment) as perceived by (1) male chairs of marketing departments within AACSB member schools and (2) female chairs of marketing departments within AACSB member schools.

METHODOLOGY

Scores are calculated for all variables. We examine regression models for the market orientation components (independent variables) and each of the consequence measures (dependent variables) of overall performance, employee esprit de corps, and employee organizational commitment for marketing chairs overall and then for each gender, addressing the first two research questions.

The third and fourth objectives are addressed by the examination of the results of Pearson correlation analyses between the three selected consequence variables. We present results of the research and discuss the potential implications. …

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