Academic journal article Education

Administrators' Use of Metaphors to Deal with Anger in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions

Academic journal article Education

Administrators' Use of Metaphors to Deal with Anger in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions

Article excerpt

Introduction

School violence emerged as a topic of interest for the education system during the past decade. School violence covers an array of intentional or reckless behaviors that include physical harm, psychological harm, and property damage. These include behaviors that vary in severity and frequency such as murder (Dwyer, Osher, & Warger, 1998);.

Anger, which can lead to violence, has become an increasingly serious problem in today's colleges. As students carry more stress, anger, and conflict into college, administrators, educators, government and parents experience increasing levels of stress, tension, helplessness, and frustration. They have adopted many strategies to deal with the student Unger and violence by offering students programs in anger and violence management However, most anger management strategies are largely cognitive, even though intense anger reactions often occur before we have time to consider consequences. As well, this approach places the onus almost entirely on the students to make changes in their behaviors.

All experts agreed that administrating, teaching and raising students how to control, rather than be controlled by their emotions is an extremely important aspect of their growth and development, that would come after we look to ourselves to make whatever changes possible to affect the situation in the process of supporting behavior change. In recognizing this issue As father, educator and administrator took it seriously and encourage me to set descriptive study as a preliminary approach to determining if a new approach to managing anger in college using the exploration of educators 'and administrators metaphorical images of anger might be successful.

Metaphor is broadly defined as "the phenomenon whereby we talk, and potentially, think about something in terms of something else" (Semino, 2008, p. 1). Counseling research has long been interested in the therapeutic use and management of metaphor. This interest has become even more pronounced for cognitive (Beck, 1995) and constructivist (Neimeyer & Mahoney, 1995) approaches to counseling, because linguists and cognitive scientists hypothesized that human conceptual understanding of abstract concepts such as "love," "causation," and "morality" are inherently metaphoric (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980).

Connelly and Clandinin (1988) argued that metaphorical images illuminate the connection between teachers' past experiences and their present action. Metaphors can provide clues about how teachers construct their worlds (Bullough & Stokes, 1994; Collins-Eaglin, 1994; Munby & Russell, 1990) and allow teachers to see how their students' behaviors are congruent with the world they as teachers have constructed. Consequently, metaphor enables teachers to move beyond their current understanding by providing a view of the situation that highlights aspects previously less salient.

A metaphor can be defined as "an implicit comparison, one which calls attention to similarities between two things by speaking of one thing as if it were another" (Petrie, 1980).

Statement of Problem and Questions

Based on the fact stated above, the study sought to explore the significance of metaphor in Dean of Student Affairs of students' anger and anger management. Through the use of an important pass experience incident, deans discovered and examined metaphorical images that embodied the thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors associated with their experiences with angry students, and that was by exploring and answering the following questions:

1. To what extend using the metaphorical images of anger by The Dean of Student Affairs help and rich their self esteem

2. To what extend using the metaphorical images of anger by The Dean of Student Affairs help to new approach to anger management?

3. To what extend using metaphorical images of anger by The Dean of Student Affairs help to manage students anger? …

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