Academic journal article Australian Journal of Music Therapy

Hadley, S. (2013). Experiencing Race as a Music Therapist: Personal Narratives

Academic journal article Australian Journal of Music Therapy

Hadley, S. (2013). Experiencing Race as a Music Therapist: Personal Narratives

Article excerpt

Hadley, S. (2013). Experiencing Race as a Music Therapist: Personal Narratives. Gilsum: Barcelona Publishers. 228 pages. Print ISBN: 978-937440-39-8. E ISBN: 978-1- 93744040-4. Cost: $AUD28.00

With this book, Hadley hopes to bring new voices and new perspectives to the contested concept of 'race.' She deploys the term 'race,' which she defines as 'a social, political and cultural concept,' ('Introduction,' p.30) purposefully to challenge her informants and her readers to discuss their assumptions and biases. Hadley interviewed seventeen music therapists about race and their experiences. These interviews were recorded and then transcribed into personal narratives that make up the core of the book, along with introductory and concluding chapters detailing Hadley's reflections, summaries and analysis of the themes that emerged. She stresses the importance of cultural self-awareness and the critical examination of white privilege and Eurocentrism in music therapy practice.

"... in music therapy there has been a tendency to examine issues of racial diversity as something pertaining to clients of color and not as something that is inclusive of white music therapists' identities. Eurocentrism permeates our theories, our musical practices, our research practices, our educational practices, and so on." ('Introduction' p51)

The therapists were asked to discuss their specific experiences of their race when they were studying music therapy and how they experienced their race in their professional lives. These therapists were selected from a range of ethno-cultural backgrounds, views and the fact that these individuals were known for their cross-cultural music therapy (academic and professional) practice. They include Sarah Hoskyns (New Zealand), Meagan Hunt (Australia), Carolyn Kenny (US), Anja Tait (Australia), Seung-A Kim (US), and Adeline Dos Santos (South Africa). Although therapists of Japanese and Korean heritage practicing in the US were included, this book did not have any informants from Asian countries such as China or Singapore. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.