Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Narrative Pedagogy: Transforming Nursing Education through 15 Years of Research in Nursing Education

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Narrative Pedagogy: Transforming Nursing Education through 15 Years of Research in Nursing Education

Article excerpt

Abstract

AIM This article provides a review of current disciplinary understanding of Narrative Pedagogy and describes the implications for ongoing transformation in nursing education.

BACKGROUND Narrative Pedagogy has been enacted and investigated by teachers around the world for more than 15 years. Few nursing educational innovations or pedagogies in nursing have been adopted in such an array of settings/levels.

METHOD A review of the nursing literature was conducted to locate reports of research on and teaching innovations derived from Narrative Pedagogy.

RESULTS Narrative Pedagogy has an extensive and longitudinal body of research describing how the approach contributes to the educational transformation the discipline seeks.

CONCLUSION Narrative Pedagogy and the growing literature describing how it is enacted provides a way for teachers and students to persist in questioning their current understanding of nursing, the ways they think about the situations they encounter, and how their practice can best be learned.

KEY WORDS

Narrative Pedagogy--Nursing Education --Nursing Education Research--Teaching Methods--Hermeneutic Phenomenology

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Nurse faculty continue to hear calls to transform nursing education to meet the challenges of the changing health care system (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010; Institute of Medicine, 2011). These challenges have been a catalyst, sparking renewed disciplinary conversations about the future of nursing education. In conventional pedagogies, faculty transform their courses by creating and implementing new strategies (e.g., simulation, unfolding case studies) or changing systems/ structural aspects of nursing education (e.g., moving to accelerated baccalaureate or master's-entry programs, standardizing curricula to avoid variation among programs).

While such disciplinary conversations are important, they fundamentally rely on extending or enhancing inherited views of nursing education, including what is taught and when and how it is taught. For example, even if consensus on what should be taught or how it should be taught were possible (or desirable), these proposals do little to fundamentally transform nursing education in ways that influence the relationships among teachers, students, and clinicians, the ways in which students shape and are shaped by what is being learned, and how teachers and students see, listen, and respond to matters of concern in clinical practice (Doane & Brown, 2011). For this kind of transformation to occur, multiple pedagogies must be added to the faculty member's teaching repertoire.

Substantive transformation begins with embracing research in nursing and higher education on multiple pedagogies, generally classified as conventional, critical, feminist, phenomenological, and postmodern (Diekelmann & Diekelmann, 2009; Ironside 2001). These pedagogies are not mutually exclusive but extend and enhance one another. As knowledge about other pedagogies broadens in nursing education, faculty can move away from finding new ways to teach the same content and skills toward a transformation of how students think and learn in nursing.

Narrative Pedagogy has been enacted and investigated by teachers around the world for more than 15 years. This article reviews current disciplinary understanding of Narrative Pedagogy and describes the implications its use provides for substantive transformation in nursing education and research.

Figure 1: The Concernful Practices of Schooling Learning
Teaching

Preserving: Attending and Being Open

Assembling: Constructing and Cultivating

Gathering: Welcoming and Calling Forth

Caring: Engendering of Community

Listening: Knowing and Connecting

Interpreting: Unlearning and Becoming

Inviting: Waiting and Letting Be

Questionings: Sense and Making Meanings Visible

Retrieving Places: Keeping Open a Future of Possibilities

Preserving: Reading, Writing, Thinking-Saying, and Dialogue

Copyright [c] 2009 by Diekelmann and Diekelmann. … 
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