Academic journal article Journal of International Technology and Information Management

The Influence of Cognitive Trust and Familiarity on Adoption and Continued Use of Smartphones: An Empirical Analysis

Academic journal article Journal of International Technology and Information Management

The Influence of Cognitive Trust and Familiarity on Adoption and Continued Use of Smartphones: An Empirical Analysis

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

In today's era of mobile commerce and globally distributed teams, technology is rapidly changing to fit the needs of this fast pace business world and society. Society has become very dependent upon mobile technology in every aspect of life including business, healthcare, education and government among others. Developers are constantly creating networks that have faster connectivity, enhanced performance, capacity and coverage. As the mobile technology industry grows, consumers grow more and more dependent on this industry as it integrates into our daily lives. As the world continues to advance, we can expect technological devices such as the smartphone (e.g., Apple's iPhone, Samsung's Galaxy, (formerly Research in Motion's) BlackBerry) to become smaller, faster, more energy efficient and more mobile.

Smartphones/Mobile devices are not just telephones. They are web browsers, GPS systems, and messaging systems. And there are many uses such as customer service and payment options, inventory management and employee dispatching. Mobility is the portability of technology. Portable technology frees employees from their desks and allows customer flexibility. Since a viable mobile business model should create both customer value and network (i.e., the organizational and financial domains) value, according to de Reuver et al. (2009) findings, addressing organizational design issues (i.e., partner selection, governance and relation management) leads to an acceptable division of roles among actors, while addressing financial design issues (i.e., pricing, division of investments and costs among partners) results in risk levels that are perceived to be acceptable.

The mobile phone has changed the way merchants and farmers do business in rural Africa and Asia. In rural China, many of the farmers cannot read and have never used the Internet, but with the help of younger tech-savvy villagers that use the Internet on their smartphones to sell produce and buy shoes and shampoo (Larson, 2013). In countries such as South Africa, where healthcare systems are overburdened and doctors are scarce, healthcare workers use an experimental smartphone based software program called Cell-Life which is used to manage the treatment of HIV/AIDS. This system combines a comprehensive database that includes a patient's treatment history and lab results with a messaging service that enables counselors, clinical staff and doctors to communicate using SMS (short messaging service). Therapeutic counselors scroll through a series of menus to report on side effects, monitor adherence, and provide detailed social information. These uses of mobile technology are only going to increase (Chief Executive Group, 2011). In today's era of mobile commerce, technology is rapidly changing to fit the needs of this fast pace business world and society. Developers are constantly creating networks that have faster connectivity, enhanced performance, capacity and coverage. Wireless devices (including smartphones) are increasingly popular across the healthcare field enabling caregivers to review patient records and test results, access charge captures, enter diagnosis information during patient visits and consult drug formularies, all without the need for a wired network connection. Patient--Provider communication through the smartphones has been beneficial because office visits are too infrequent and expensive, print mail usually is unread causing a break in continuity of patient care. The smartphone enhances communication with the patient. The use of voice, web access and text messaging helps the patient with reminders such as appointments and medications. The different features and applications on smartphones can also help clinician better track patient behavior and intervene when more intense care is needed (e.g., when asthmatics or diabetics need assistance). This technology has the potential to transform healthcare practices through streamlining operations, optimizing efficiencies, and improving patient outcomes and safety. …

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