Academic journal article Madhya Pradesh Journal of Social Sciences

Dynasty in Indian Politics: A Study Focusing Haryana State

Academic journal article Madhya Pradesh Journal of Social Sciences

Dynasty in Indian Politics: A Study Focusing Haryana State

Article excerpt

Introduction: Development of Dynastic Politics

Roots of dynasty politics run so deep that even the son of the President of India had secured a party nomination. This has been done to topple his challengers which include an erstwhile powerful lone wolf Congress loyalist who fell out of favour with the Congress leadership at the centre. Most of the other political parties also follow the leader in dynasty politics. The ruling elite in regional parties have ensured that their successors are in the power game. It has to be seen as a profession and its roots go back to the caste system. Dynastic politics in India an off-shoot of caste system Hindu religious ideology explains how the four Vamas were founded. According to Rig Veda, the ancient Hindu book, the primal man--Punish--destroyed himself to create a human society. The different Vamas were created from different parts of his body. The Brahmans were created from his head; the Kshatrias from his hands; the Vaishias from his thighs and the Sndras from his feet. The Varna hierarchy is determined by the descending order of different organs from which the Vamas were created. Other religious theory claims that the Vamas were created from the body organs of Brahma, who is the creator of the world. The psychological theory talks about Sattva qualities include wisdom, intelligence, honesty, goodness and other positive qualities. Rajas include qualities like passion, pride, valour and other passionate qualities. Tamas qualities include dullness, stupidity, lack of creativity and other negative qualities. People with different doses of these inherent qualities adopted different types of occupation. According to this theory, Brahmans inherit Sattva qualities. Kshatrias and Vaishias inherit Rajas qualities. And the Sudras accede to Tamas qualities. In order to secure their status the Aryans resolved some social and religious rules which allowed only them to be the priests, warriors and the businessmen of the society. As in most of the societies of the world, so in India, the son inherited his father's profession. And so in India there developed families, who professed the same family profession for generation in which, the son continued his father's profession. (Insight: 2011) This trend of family profession and groupism may be led politicians to groom their children as their political heirs. Through this paper, an attempt has been made to analyse dynastic factor in Indian politics with special focus on Haryana state.

National Politics and Dynastic Factor

Dynastic factor, which is a crucial issue in politics can be seen in other democratic countries too. For instance, Kennedy and family played influential role in American political spectrum for a long period. George Bush (Junior) became the President of USA after his father George W. Bush. According to Professor Imitiyaz Ahmad, though dynastism is found out side of India but the difference is that there are one or two such instances in foreign countries. On other hand, in our country it has grown into a conventional dimension. In India, dynastic factor and personality cult in politics and elections has been a predominant factor right from the beginning of our democracy (the independence). It has been observed that Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India, dominated Indian politics up to 1964. Congress continued to sweep the electoral battles in its favour under his charismatic leadership. However, after him also, Congress dominated the entire political scenario till the Congress culture was alive and other mass leaders like Lal Bahadur Shastri were in Congress.

In a weak moment, Jawaharlal Nehru allowed Indira Gandhi one term as Congress President. His fellow Congressmen, such as Mahatma Gandhi, Vallabhbhai Patel and Rajendra Prasad, steadfastly refused to bring their own progeny into politics. In 1960, Frank Moraes wrote that "there is no question of Nehru's attempting to create a dynasty of his own; it would be inconsistent with his character and career". …

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