Academic journal article Science Scope

The World of Endangered Animals: South and Central Asia

Academic journal article Science Scope

The World of Endangered Animals: South and Central Asia

Article excerpt

The World of Endangered Animals: South and Central Asia By Tim Harris. $27.95. 64 pp. Black Rabbit Books. Mankato, MN. 2015. ISBN: 9781781210772.

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Are your students concerned about endangered animals? Do you personally need an update on the status of Asian endangered animals? This book starts with an overall look at the habitats of, threats to, and conservation efforts for endangered species in South and Central Asia. The author examines animals from several categories, from snow leopards and Asian elephants to spoon-billed sandpipers.

For each animal, the book provides a data panel with information on world populations, habitat, related endangered species, and more. The maps are a great help in understanding the geographic locations of these animals. Appendixes feature wildlife organizations and a list of more endangered animals. A glossary is provided to clarify terms in the book and resources on books and websites to offer more in-depth, specific information on birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, and general topics related to endangered animals.

The author of the books used a classification system for endangered species with which I was not familiar. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature focuses on categories of threat: extinct (no reasonable doubt the species is dead); extinct in the wild (survives only in captivity or artificially established conditions); critically endangered (faces an extremely high risk of extinction in the immediate future in the wild); endangered (faces a very high risk of extinction in the near future in the wild); vulnerable (faces a high risk of extinction in the medium-term future in the wild); near threatened/least concern (does not qualify for preceding categories but is likely to qualify in the future); data deficient (not enough information to assess the risk of extinction); and not evaluated (yet to be assessed). …

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