Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Article excerpt

Authors who submit research articles to the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) are always urged to think about implications for practice and include such information as part of their articles or reports. As a result of the journal's efforts to be attentive to the needs of practitioners, this issue offers much information about what such professionals can do to better serve their students and clients. Early in the issue, DePountis and colleagues provide readers with a list of assistive technology devices that teachers have found particularly useful in advanced mathematics classes. The article offers a list of technological devices and provides suggestions about which ones might be included as part of a teachers' tool kit or an assistive technology training course for prospective teachers in personnel preparation programs. Heyl and colleagues suggest that teachers, including those who work with young children, need to pay more attention to providing intellectual environments that promote executive function in children who have visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision), especially those who have additional disabilities. Haegele has suggestions for strategies that individuals can use to promote their own leisure time physical activities outside of school--tips that I found to be personally relevant when I recently checked my step-recording device to see if I had beaten my sister in the number of steps we had taken that day. I had not, as usual. To say the work of editing a scholarly research journal is sedentary is an understatement.

I was particularly fascinated by Bruce's article on humane education, and I encourage readers to avoid being misled by the title. The article uses a case study approach to examine how to teach children who are visually impaired the knowledge and skills they will need if they would like to own dog guides in the future. Ball and Nicolle's article uses grounded theory in a fascinating way to determine the mobility-related behaviors, or strategies, of adults with visual impairments. …

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