Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

"Mother Emanuel" African Methodist Episcopal Church History

Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

"Mother Emanuel" African Methodist Episcopal Church History

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The history of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church reflects the development of religious institutions for African Americans in Charleston. Dating back to the fall of 1787 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Richard Allen (1760-1831) founded the Free African Society, adhering to the Doctrines of Methodism established by John Wesley. In 1816, Black members of Charleston's Methodist Episcopal Church withdrew over disputed burial ground, and under the leadership of Morris Brown. The Rev. Morris Brown organized a church of persons of color and sought to have it affiliated with Allen's church. Three churches arose under the Free African Society and were named the "Bethel Circuit". One of the Circuit churches was located in the suburbs of Ansonborough, Hampstead, and Cow Alley, now known as Philadelphia Alley in the French Quarters of Charleston. Emanuel's congregation grew out of the Hampstead Church, located at Reid and Hanover Streets.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Negro Plot. An Account of the Late Intended Insurrection among a Portion of the Blacks of the City of Charleston, South Carolina" (J. Hamilton, Jun. Intendant Second Edition, 50 p. Boston, printed and published by Joseph W. Ingraham, 1822; published by the Authority of the Corporation of Charleston; Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). In 1822 the church was investigated for its involvement with a planned revolt of the enslaved. …

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