Academic journal article Australian Journal of Music Education

Special Edition: Historical Research in Music Education

Academic journal article Australian Journal of Music Education

Special Edition: Historical Research in Music Education

Article excerpt

This special edition of the Australian Journal of Music Education presents twelve articles that explore different aspects of the history of music education. These include articles that focus on the contributions of individual music educators, others look at particular events that involved large groups of children performing complex and carefully structured musical items. There are also articles that describe the development of music education in particular contexts over decades. The work of music education historians is vital in giving current music educators an understanding of what has been done so that we have a better picture of what is happening now. We work in a time of calls for standardization and reform in education that often overlook the potential of the arts to offer all aesthetic experiences that engage all our senses.

In this special edition, Arya Bastaninezhad presents 'A Historical overview of Iranian music pedagogy (1906-2010)' which provides an insight into the development of a system relatively unknown outside of Iran. Marilyn Chaseling and William Boyd have contributed two articles that consider the progress of music education in New South Wales and teacher education during this period. Jane Southcott discusses the mammoth pageant performed by thousands of children in South Australia to mark the State's centenary. This event was one of the last of such magnitude although massed celebrations by children have remained a feature of school music ever since the beginning of state supported education. Two further papers focus on particular aspects of school music. Renee Crawford discusses the establishment and role of technology in secondary school music in Australia and Angela Lee looks at the inclusion of patriotic songs in school music textbooks in the second half of the twentieth century.

Several articles are biographical and focus on individuals or small groups of individuals that range across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Two of these biographical papers feature exponents of Dalcroze Eurhythmics. Joan Pope writes about Cecilia John, a determined and dedicated woman who travelled from Australia to learn the method and stayed in England to support the London School. …

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