Academic journal article Technology and Engineering Teacher

Learning by Doing Study: Analysis of Second-Year Results

Academic journal article Technology and Engineering Teacher

Learning by Doing Study: Analysis of Second-Year Results

Article excerpt

This is the third of a series of reports discussing the Doing-Based Learning study. The first report (Round 1) (Moye, Dugger, & Starkweather, 2014a) introduced the study, defined "doing" in the context of this study, described why students "doing" in the classroom is important, why there is a need for this study, and also provided some selected findings from the first round of surveys. The second report (Round 2) (Moye, Dugger, & Stark-weather, 2014b) identified the methods used and results of the first-round data. This report identifies the purpose of the study, identifies where the survey methods may be found, provides the number and percentages of responses, selected findings, and the future of this longevity study.

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which U.S. public school students are doing activities in their classrooms. This five-year study asks elementary and secondary (middle and high school) science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers to respond to 13 statements concerning students doing in their classrooms. The first two statements are general in nature and were used at all grade levels. The remaining 11 statements are grade-level-specific and based on Next Generation Science Standards, Standards for Technological Literacy, and Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Study methodology details can be found in Moye, Dugger, and Starkweather, 2014a, and Moye, Dugger, and Starkweather, 2014b.

The researchers sent emails to 5,232 teachers across the United States. The emails contained a cover letter explaining the study and provided a URL encouraging teachers to participate.

FINDINGS

This round was open for teacher participation from March 1 until April 15, 2015. To be eligible to participate in this study, teachers needed to identify themselves as science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM) teachers. Many responding teachers identified themselves as other than STEM teachers, and therefore were not included in this study. For example, some responding teachers were family and consumer science, automotive, health care, physical education, as well as other content area teachers. There were a total of 1,351 eligible teachers participating in this round. Of that number, 296 were elementary teachers, 254 secondary science, 606 secondary technology and engineering, and 195 secondary mathematics teachers. Teachers were asked to respond to two general statements. The statements were designed to determine how teachers felt about students learning by doing in the classroom. Table 1 identifies the first two statements, the number of teachers who responded "Yes," and the total number of responses to each statement. Data for both Rounds 1 (2014) and 2 (2015) are included.

Of the 296 elementary teachers who responded to Statements 1 and 2, 243 responded to Statements 3 through 13. Table 2 identifies elementary school Statements 3 through 13, the number of teachers who responded "Yes," the total number of respondents, and the percentage of teachers indicating "Yes" to each statement. Elementary-level data for both Rounds 1 and 2 are included. The last row of the table contains the number of "Yes" responses/total responses and percentages of doing in courses. The researchers derived this information by adding the number of "Yes" responses in the Elem. column and divided that number by the total number of responses.

Table 3 identifies middle school Statements 3 through 13, the number of teachers who replied "Yes," the total number of responding teachers, and the percentage of teachers indicating "Yes" to each statement. Of the 425 middle school teachers who responded to Statements 1 and 2, 366 responded to Statements 3 through 13. Eighty-three were science, 218 were technology and engineering, and 65 were mathematics teachers. The last row of the table contains the number of "Yes" responses/total responses and percentages of doing in courses. …

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