Academic journal article Military Review

The Secret War for the Middle East: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II

Academic journal article Military Review

The Secret War for the Middle East: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II

Article excerpt

THE SECRET WAR FOR THE MIDDLE EAST: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II

Youssef Aboul-Enein and Basil Aboul-Enein, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland, 2013, 256 pages

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Capturing the hearts of the populace by outlining the plight created by foreign powers seeking to undermine one's own interest may sound like a story from Twitter but, instead, it was heard over radio broadcasts from places such as Berlin and Baghdad in the late 1930s. Harnessing the media of the day--and skillfully embedding messages into propaganda that compared the plight of Germany to that of Palestine--the Axis powers intertwined fascist ideology with the growing Arab Nationalism movement during this period in an effort to influence the population. This history to gain influence and control the Middle East during World War II is exquisitely recounted by Youssef and Basil Aboul-Enein in The Secret War for the Middle East: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II.

The authors detail the saga to gain influence over the masses through in-depth research based on Western and Arab sources, supplemented by first-hand sources that detail the strategies employed by both the Axis and Allied powers. Building on lessons learned from World War I and the Great Arab Revolt of 1916, the Axis powers worked to capitalize on the victimization produced by the 1919 Paris Peace Conference and the growing "Palestine Question" What started as an attempt by Germany to gain allies in the Middle East in the 1930s, supported by individuals like Haj Amin el-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, may have set the foundation that helped inspire the nationalist ideals of individuals such as Nasser Hussein, the Ba'ath Party, and Saddam Hussein, and continue to influence today's extremists. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.