Academic journal article Comparative Drama

Michele Marrapodi, Ed.: Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition

Academic journal article Comparative Drama

Michele Marrapodi, Ed.: Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition

Article excerpt

Michele Marrapodi, ed. Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014. Pp. xiii + 373. $129.95.

This volume begins with a list of figures (vii-viii), notes on contributors (ix-xii), acknowledgments (xiii), and an introduction, "Shakespearean Subversions," by the editor (1-20). The primary text includes essays in three parts. Part 1, "Appropriations of Poetry and Prose," includes: Harry Berger, Jr., "Sprezzatura and Embarrassment in The Merchant of Venice" (21-38); John Roe, "A Niggle of Doubt: Courtliness and Chastity in Shakespeare and Castiglione" (39-56); Thomas Kullman, "Dramatic Appropriations of Italian Courtliness" (57-72); Maria Del Sapio Garbero, "Disowning the Bond: Coriolanus's Forgetful Humanism" (73-92); Melissa Walter, "Matteo Bandello's Social Authorship and Paulina as Patroness in The Winter's Tale" (93-106); Karen Zych Galbraith, "Tracing a Villain: Typological Intertexuality in the Works of Pinter, Webster, Cinthio, and Shakespeare" (107-22). Part 2, "Transformations of Topoi and Theatregrams," includes: Keir Elam, '"Wanton pictures': The Baffling of Christopher Sly and the Visual-Verbal Intercourse of Early Modern Erotic Arts" (123-46); Sergio Costola and Michael Saenger, "Shylock's Venice and the Grammar of the Modern City" (147-62); Eric Nicholson, "Helen, the Italianate Theatrical Wayfarer of All's Well That Ends Well" (163-80); Bruce W. …

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