Academic journal article Theological Studies

Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality and Activism in Chicana, Latina, and Indigenous Women's Lives

Academic journal article Theological Studies

Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality and Activism in Chicana, Latina, and Indigenous Women's Lives

Article excerpt

Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality and Activism in Chicana, Latina, and Indigenous Women's Lives. Edited by Elisa Facio and Irene Lara. Tucson: University of Arizona, 2014. Pp. xi + 272. $29.95.

As its title indicates, the volume weaves together the concepts of spirit(s), Spirit(s), spirituality, healing, and social activism. The book's editors define spirituality as "a conscious, self-reflecting way of life and a way of relating to others, to ourselves and to 's/Spirit'" (4). In this way, the authors describe the spiritual journeys of Chicana, Latina, and indigenous women who struggled against oppressive social and religious systems to find wholeness and empowerment in indigenous and feminine images of the divine, and to continue to resist injustice.

The book is divided into four sections in the tradition of Native American spirituality associated with "the Four Directions--East, West, North, and South"--emphasizing the interconnectedness among all beings as a central component of spiritual activism (13). Part I proposes an indigenous feminist spiritual anthropology and practices that can heal the mind-body split and decolonize one's sense of self from oppressive systems. La Virgen de Guadalupe is experienced as "the feminine energy of Tonantzin" (67). Tonantzin/Guadalupe is "a spiritual figure symbolizing the humanity and subjectivity of indigenous people and the need to work towards social justice" (53). …

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