Academic journal article Public Personnel Management

The Mediating Effects of Organizational and Supervisor Identification for Interactional Justice: The Case of Sichuan Civil Servants in China

Academic journal article Public Personnel Management

The Mediating Effects of Organizational and Supervisor Identification for Interactional Justice: The Case of Sichuan Civil Servants in China

Article excerpt

Interactional justice refers to interpersonal treatment people receive during the enactment of formal procedures (Bies & Moag, 1986). Because interpersonal relationships are strongly emphasized in Chinese culture (Yang, 2009), interactional justice arising from personal interactions may be particularly important for public human resource management in China. Research has revealed that interactional justice is more important in Chinese culture than other types of justice (e.g., procedural justice, Lee & Wei, 2007; Wang, 2009). However, the issue of interactional justice seems to be neglected in the literature of public personnel management in China. To our knowledge, only one study has investigated Chinese civil servants' interactional justice perception by focusing on its effect on contextual performance (Lu, Zhao, & Liu, 2011). Therefore, our current study would continue to examine Chinese civil servants' interactional justice issue. Specifically, we extended previous research on interactional justice in terms of centering on Chinese civil servants' self-identities as psychological mechanisms to explain how interactional justice affected working outcomes.

We introduced the group engagement model from organizational justice research as our theoretical framework to study the psychological mechanisms of interactional justice. The group engagement model integrates the domains of organizational justice and self-identity research (Blader & Tyler, 2009; Tyler & Blader, 2003). The model suggests that organizational justice delivers status-relevant information and shapes individuals' social aspects of self-identity, which in turn facilitate positive organizational outcomes such as extra-role behaviors and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). Subsequent studies on this model empirically examined the effects of interactional justice (De Cremer, Tyler, & den Ouden, 2005; Olkkonen & Lipponen, 2006) by centering on two types of self-identities. One is self-identity at the group level arising from one's relationship with a particular organization or group (e.g., organizational or work-unit identification). Olkkonen and Lipponen found that work-unit identification mediated the relationship between interactional justice and extra-role behaviors toward the work unit. The other is at the interpersonal level (i.e., relational identification) arising from one's dyadic relationship with a specific person (in interactional justice research, the person is the one who enacts organizational procedures, for example, a supervisor). De Cremer et al. found that employees' identification with colleagues mediated the relationship between interactional justice and OCB. However, the differential mediating roles that organizational identification and relational identification may play have been neglected in these studies. This may be because these two identifications are not simultaneously considered in these studies. Organizational identification and relational identification have different consequences. Organizational identification is related to organization-focused outcomes, whereas relational identification is related to interpersonal outcomes (e.g., Brewer & Gardner, 1996; van Knippenberg, van Knippenberg, De Cremer, & Hogg, 2004). Unfortunately, previous studies do not consider this issue while defining outcomes (e.g., De Cremer et al., 2005). As relational identification and organizational identification have different consequences, their mediating effects thus may be differential.

Therefore, our current study was aimed to understand the differential mediating roles of Chinese civil servants' organizational identification and supervisor identification (relational identification with the supervisor) for interactional justice. As we noted before, these two kinds of identifications may be related to different work criteria, and we therefore differentiated between organization-focused and supervisor-focused outcomes as responses to interactional justice. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.