Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Talking Cars Must Learn to Hold Their Tongues

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Talking Cars Must Learn to Hold Their Tongues

Article excerpt

Smart telephones and TVs are well-established, but that's not true of the new smart cars that can talk to the driver as though there were a person sitting in the passenger seat. Researchers from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden assert that smart cars should consider both the driver and the traffic situation before speaking.

Using real people driving in real traffic, PhD candidate Jessica Villing explored how the interaction between the driver and modern in-vehicle dialog systems, such as navigation systems, can be improved to reduce the driver's cognitive workload and therefore increase traffic safety.

Most experiments of this type are conducted in simulators, where drivers are given mathematical problems to solve while driving. Villing wanted to know how a real conversation with a passenger affects us when driving a car.

"Humans are good at reading people they're talking to, so looking at how passengers and drivers interact provides a perfect model for tomorrow's dialog systems," she says.

The car's dialog system should interact "as if it were a passenger in your car who is able to see what you see and therefore take external factors into account when communicating, such as keeping quiet if heavy traffic makes the driver notably stressed and having a feel for when it is a good time to talk and give instructions," Villing says. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.