Academic journal article Folk Music Journal

Editorial

Academic journal article Folk Music Journal

Editorial

Article excerpt

Preparing this issue of Folk Music Journal for the press feels to have been dominated by obituaries and in particular by the loss of two members of our Editorial Board, Eddie Cass and Roy Palmer, since this time last year. I will not write much more here because there are full obituaries of both of them in this issue. In addition, because Roy's interests were so wide and his output so great, we have decided also to print a bibliography of his published work. Neither Eddie nor Roy will easily be replaced, either on the Board or in the wider sphere of scholarship covered by FMJ.

The perception is that it is becoming ever more difficult for young scholars to pursue interests in the field, not least because of the financial constraints and institutional narrow-mindedness that pervade the higher education sector. Nevertheless, we are always keen to encourage younger scholars, and we do know that there are people out there working on folk song, music, dance, and drama, so please consider Folk Music Journal as a potential outlet for your work. We pride ourselves both on being the leading journal in the field and on providing a nurturing environment for scholars who submit their work to us.

The current issue addresses matters close to home in the form of Arthur Knevett's study of the merger of the Folk-Song Society and the English Folk Dance Society to form the EFDSS. The ramifications of the merger are still being felt today and it is good to have the historical details and their implications spelled out clearly for today's researchers and performers. Alice Little's article addresses an important chapter in the late Victorian development of the 'science of human culture', and in the course of it introduces us to an extraordinary folk music instrument, the 'Whit-horn' (the spelling of which has given the editor many sleepless nights). I had the good fortune to visit Kosovo this summer and among the ethnographic collections there I was delighted to find several similar instruments (though they did not call them Whit-horns! …

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