Academic journal article Labour/Le Travail

"They Were Making Good Money, Just Ten Minutes from Home": Proximity and Distance in the Plant Shutdown Stories of Northern Ontario Mill Workers

Academic journal article Labour/Le Travail

"They Were Making Good Money, Just Ten Minutes from Home": Proximity and Distance in the Plant Shutdown Stories of Northern Ontario Mill Workers

Article excerpt

WORKING AT THE MILL HAD BEEN a family affair for generations of Sturgeon Falls' mill workers, as young men followed their fathers, uncles, older brothers, and occasionally mothers, into the Northern Ontario mill--the town's largest employer for more than a century. The mill's workforce was overwhelmingly white and male, with a historic linguistic divide between largely English-speaking managers and mainly French-speaking production workers. This linguistic division of labour and the near total exclusion of Aboriginal people were remnants of industrial colonialism in the region. Within a year of the mill's December 2002 closure, I began interviewing the former employees about their experiences and these interviews continued for the next two years. During that time, efforts to reopen the mill fizzled out and it was demolished by the departing company. Work-life oral histories offer us a way into the shifting sands of culture and economy in this former mill town. This article explores the shifting sense of temporal and spatial proximity or distance in the plant shutdown stories told by 37 former mill workers. Several dimensions of proximity are explored such as the temporal proximity of the interview to the events being recounted, the perceived social proximity that prevailed before the mill closing, the remembered physical proximity of the mill in the narrated lives of residents, and, now, after the mill's closure, the spectre of forced relocation or distant daily commutes to new jobs in other towns and cities. For long-service workers, employment mobility or permanent relocation was understood to be a last resort. These interviews make clear that forced employment mobility was a core concern to everyone we interviewed, not just those who actually relocated or commuted to jobs found elsewhere.

TRAVAILLER A L'USINE AVAIT ETE UNE AFFAIRE de famille pour les generations de travailleurs de l'usine de Sturgeon Falls, que les jeunes hommes ont suivi leurs peres, oncles, freres plus ages, et parfois leurs meres, dans le broyeur au Nord de l'Ontario--le plus grand employeur de la ville depuis plus d'un siecle. L'effectif de l'usine etait majoritairement de race blanche et de sexe masculin, avec un clivage linguistique historique entre gestionnaires largement anglophones et travailleurs de la production majoritairement francophones. Cette division linguistique du travail et l'exclusion presque totale des Autochtones etaient des restes du colonialisme industriel dans la region. Moins d'un an suivant la fermeture de l'usine en decembre 2002, je commencais a interviewer les anciens employes au sujet de leurs experiences et ces entretiens se sont poursuivis pour les deux annees suivantes. Pendant ce temps, les efforts pour rouvrir l'usine ont fait long feu et elle a ete demolie par la compagnie au depart. Les histoires orales de la vie professionnelle nous offrent un chemin dans les sables mouvants de la culture et de l'economie dans cette ancienne ville industrielle. Cet article explore le sens de decalage de la proximite ou la distance temporelle et spatiale dans les histoires de la fermeture des usines racontees par 37 anciens travailleurs. Plusieurs dimensions de la proximite sont explorees comme la proximite temporelle de l'entrevue pour les evenements racontes, la proximite sociale percue qui prevalait avant la fermeture de l'usine, la proximite physique souvenue de l'usine dans la vie des residents, et, maintenant, apres la fermeture de l'usine, le spectre de la reinstallation forcee ou les lointains deplacements quotidiens vers de nouveaux emplois dans d'autres villes. Pour les travailleurs du service de longue duree, la mobilite de l'emploi ou la relocalisation permanente a ete consideree comme un dernier recours. Ces entretiens montrent clairement que la mobilite forcee de l'emploi etait une preoccupation centrale a tous les travailleurs que nous avons interviewes, et pas seulement ceux qui ont effectivement deplace ou commue aux emplois trouves ailleurs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.