Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

It's All about Care: The NLN at the Forefront of Nursing: Caring Is Why Learners Seek Nursing and Why the Development of Caring, Compassionate Nurses Is the Work of Faculties and a Sacred Trust

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

It's All about Care: The NLN at the Forefront of Nursing: Caring Is Why Learners Seek Nursing and Why the Development of Caring, Compassionate Nurses Is the Work of Faculties and a Sacred Trust

Article excerpt

For me, education is the crown jewel of our profession. Each of us indirectly influences more patient care than any single researcher, administrator, or nurse ever could. Through the NLN, we can strengthen our own faculty tool kits. And in the next two years, while I have the honor to be NLN president, we will add to our expertise in two distinct ways. International

The NLN's mission statement includes an important word: global. During our two years together, we will focus on international nursing education and educators. Advances in health care practices span the planet as quickly as diseases like Ebola take airplane rides to new populations. I believe it is essential that we alert our students to their identities as citizens of the global village and that we ourselves, as global faculty, show the world how to use international awareness to build best practices.

Over the years, I have learned from nurse faculty around the world. Rich conversations have opened my eyes to similarities and variations in both nursing care and education. Our languages may be different, but our messages are the same: Nurse educators speak the language of the heart. Our passion for human beings and their welfare permeates our lives.

Like nurse faculty in the United States, our global counterparts are responsible for the quality of their programs and their graduates. Their unique pathways to excellence are fascinating and merit our attention. Let us consider, for example, clinical instruction. For many of us, the difficulty of finding clinical placements for our students and competent clinical faculty to guide them is a barrier to program effectiveness and expansion that hinders our efforts to address the urgent need for more nurses, and for more well-educated nurses.

Other nations tackle clinical faculty differently. In some places, guiding students is part of the professional role of all nurses, an expectation in their job descriptions. They routinely work as preceptors, without university-based faculty on site. What can we learn from educators who design courses and work in that way? How can those educators learn from the clinical faculty roles we use?

I can say without hesitation that there is excellence in many international programs that reaches and exceeds the standards of our Centers of Excellence program. …

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