Academic journal article Seventeenth-Century News

Neo-Latin and the Humanities. Essays in Honour of Charles E. Fantazzi

Academic journal article Seventeenth-Century News

Neo-Latin and the Humanities. Essays in Honour of Charles E. Fantazzi

Article excerpt

* Neo-Latin and the Humanities. Essays in Honour of Charles E. Fantazzi. Edited by Luc Deitz, Timothy Kircher, and Jonathan Reid. Essays and Studies, 32. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2014. 289 pp. $34.95. In February, 2011 a symposium on "Neo-Latin and the Humanities" was given at East Carolina University in honour of Professor Charles Fantazzi; most of the contributions to this book originated there. Fantazzi's work on Neo-Latin in general and Jean Luis Vives in particular is mirrored in the book and makes it more focused than such collections usually are.

Of special interest is the chapter by James Hankins on "Charles Fantazzi and the Study of Neo-Latin Literature," because with his survey of the research in Neo-Latin from the sixteenth century to the present, Hankins offers both an introduction to the subject and a proposal of how to characterise its various phases. Thus the essay is a brilliant contribution to the ongoing debate over the ways and means of Neo-Latin research, even though it concentrates almost exclusively on editorial work. A pleasant aspect is Hankins's enthusiasm: "Neo-Latin philology is in the best condition it has ever been in" (41, a conclusion not shared by all contributors, though; see 270).

In "The Rolls of the Dead and the Intellectual Revival of the Twelfth Century in Francia and Italy," Ronald G. Witt analyses the French death rolls as reflections of the clerical community that produced them, whereas their absence in the regnum south of the Alps reveals a more fragmented clergy there. Timothy Kircher's "Wrestling with Ulysses: Humanist Translations of Homeric Epic around 1440" is a brilliant study of the early humanists' theory and practice of translation, exemplified by the competition between Lorenzo Valla, Leonardo Bruni, and Leon Battista Alberti.

With "Colligite fragmenta: A Neglected Tumulus for Joannes Ludovicus Vives (1492-1540)," Jeanine De Landtsheer and Marcus De Schepper bring Professor Fantazzi a very special gift: a manuscript in Berlin containing fifteen funerary poems for Vives, of which seven have not been published before. Vives is also the protagonist in Paul F. Grendler's "The Attitudes of the Jesuits toward Juan Luis Vives." Most of the founding Jesuits shared their Spanish background and Parisian education with Vives. …

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