Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Teaching Indigenous Students: Cultural Awareness and Classroom Strategies for Improving Learning Outcomes

Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Teaching Indigenous Students: Cultural Awareness and Classroom Strategies for Improving Learning Outcomes

Article excerpt

Teaching Indigenous students: cultural awareness and classroom strategies for improving learning outcomes

Thelma Perso & Colleen Hayward 2015

Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW, 280pp, ISBN 9781743316061 (pbk)

Teaching Indigenous students is a useful teachers' handbook, meant for self-discovery and learning by all. It is appropriate for new teachers, as well as well-seasoned teachers and teachers transitioning within schools throughout Australia. It provides a review of relevant literature on teaching Indigenous students and, more importantly, provides basic step-by-step suggestions for obtaining and strengthening cultural capacity. Throughout the book readers are provided guiding questions to assess their own teaching knowledge, skills and styles, as well as their own biases and assumptions. Information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures is presented generically and readers are urged to actively take steps to learn more accurate information about the specific cultural group(s) they are working with, or in whose land(s) they teach.

This book should be required in all teacher education programs before teachers ever set foot in a classroom, along with books and material on the actual history of Indigenous education in Australia. Although information in the book is informative for practice, statements are often made with little to no follow-up or explanation, assuming perhaps that teachers will go out and find answers to any questions raised. Issues of trust, for instance, are brought up by the authors: 'For Indigenous students in remote locations, there is likely to be distrust and even hostility towards whitefellas, which may have been passed down for generations' (p. 238). However, explanations for this lack of trust found among many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and their generational existence might be better understood if expanded upon. It should not be only the Indigenous peoples of a country who remember and find ways to live with the historical damages of colonisation and its resulting trauma. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.