Academic journal article Teacher Education Quarterly

Editor's Introduction

Academic journal article Teacher Education Quarterly

Editor's Introduction

Article excerpt

Dear TEQ Readers,

As I mentioned in a previous issue, past editor Chris Faltis, the Editorial Board, and I made the decision a year or so ago to move away from themed issues and thus the need for an editorial explanation of why the articles in any given issue of the journal were included. However, I did not give up an Editor's right to lead a volume with my own musings, and a remarkable scene at our last California Council on Teacher Education (CCTE) conference in San Jose reminded me of exactly why I wanted to retain the opportunity to address Teacher Education Quarterly readers. The scene? Nearly 20 past CCTE presidents assembled on the dais to celebrate the organization's 70th anniversary and to hear Professor Gary Fenstermacher deliver a paper (the lead article in this issue, in fact).

As you may know, Gary is a longtime, dear friend to CCTE and his remarks which comprise this wonderful paper reminded us why we stay involved in the organization. As Gary's heartfelt comments revealed, CCTE is a place of unique belongingness. He mentioned his first CCTE meeting roughly five decades ago when he had a revelatory moment: "Everybody was nice and welcomed me." Like many others, I experienced the exact same sentiment at my first CCTE meeting nearly three decades ago. Unlike the gargantuan education conferences today with programs the size of a phone book (for those of you who remember phone books) or the stuffy administrator-led gatherings where it seems few attendees actually work in teacher education, CCTE conferences are relevant, personal, and yes, "nice." Much of this has to do with the amazing past presidents who we honored this spring.

I personally want to thank Deborah Hamm and Mona Thompson, who assembled a set of historical CCTE documents as part of the 70th anniversary. I stood in the registration room until my feet hurt and read a report on the state of teacher education from the early 1960s, and thought about how different conditions were back then. …

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