Academic journal article The Journal of the Civil War Era

Editor's Note

Academic journal article The Journal of the Civil War Era

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

For the past five years, Bill Blair introduced to Journal of the Civil War Era readers the contents of each issue, pointing out the common themes among the essays and indicating when they carry on conversations from previous issues. These short introductions give little indication of the work and energy Bill devoted to the issue, recruiting manuscripts, shepherding them along, and gently guiding each author to make the strongest case possible for the significance of her/his work. All of us who have been part of this project--editors, board members, authors, and readers--owe Bill a debt of gratitude for creating this new journal, which in just five years has breathed new life into the field of Civil War history, broadened it to an "era," and dismantled boundaries that once isolated "Civil War historians" from historians of the antebellum and postbellum United States, African American and gender historians, and scholars who look at comparable state crises in Europe and Latin America. I will start by thanking Bill and promising Journal readers to do my best to fill his very big shoes.

The research articles in this issue provide new insights into the beginning of the war, the collapse of the Confederacy, and the repercussions from that conflict that connected the national and the international--as well as reveal a story that has not been told.

Matthew Mason's essay on the Senate's debate concerning Edward Everett's nomination to serve as minister to Great Britain in 1841 highlights how political differences over slavery shaped both domestic and international politics. …

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