Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

5 Must-Knows about the New E-Rate: Take Advantage of E-Rate Dollars to Construct a Network That's Future-Proof

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

5 Must-Knows about the New E-Rate: Take Advantage of E-Rate Dollars to Construct a Network That's Future-Proof

Article excerpt

No one wants to leave money on the table. However, that's just what you'll face if your district doesn't pursue funding for boosting its Internet access and bolstering its internal networking connections under the modernized E-rate program. The stated goals for the new E-rate, adopted by the Federal Communications Commission in 2014. are threefold:

1. Getting "affordable" access to high-speed broadband to support digital learning in schools

2. Optimizing the cost-effectiveness of spending for E-rate supported purchases

3. Simplifying and speeding up the E-rate application process

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

These five points provide a quick briefing on aspects of the program you may not understand:

1. Within and Without:

Category One of the Universal Service for Schools and Libraries Program includes services, such as fiber, that deliver data transmission and Internet access to schools. (It can also cover wireless services and wireless Internet access if those individual plans are the most cost-effective way to provide broadband for mobile devices at schools.) Category Two deals with the internal connections within schools, such as access points, wireless controller systems and switches, and basic internal connection management.

2. The Rural Premium: Most rural districts (those with a population below 50,000 people) get an extra discount in their applications. If the rural district's population of students eligible for the national school lunch program is between one and 49 percent, the discount will be 10 percent higher. For example, if the poverty level is 30 percent, a district would be eligible for a discount for either category of services of 50 percent in an urban area and 60 percent in a rural area. The catch here is carriers that receive the subsidies for rural areas through Category One must offer high-speed broadband to schools at rates comparable to similar services in urban areas.

3. State Support: To drive states to take care of their schools, the FCC has a new program to match dollar for dollar up to 10 percent of the state contribution for eligible new broadband construction, such as last-mile build-outs and infrastructure projects. One catch here is projects must aspire to build infrastructure that meets FCC's broadband capacity targets (100 Mbps per 1000 users for the short term and 1 Gbps per 1000 users for the long term. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.