Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Evaluating PowerPoint Presentations: A Retrospective Study Examining Educational Barriers and Strategies

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Evaluating PowerPoint Presentations: A Retrospective Study Examining Educational Barriers and Strategies

Article excerpt

Abstract

AIM To assess faculty adherence to best practices for PowerPoint presentations in nursing school curricula.

BACKGROUND It is important to examine current educational methods and identify best educational practices that contribute to a high quality nursing curriculum.

METHOD A retrospective study approach was used. Data were collected from 1,735 slide presentations from five universities. PowerPoint[R] presentations were compared to a nine-point standardized scoring criterion for quality.

RESULTS Findings provide evidence that indicated classroom presentations often fall short of providing best educational practices.

CONCLUSION These findings can lead to greater faculty understanding of best practices and provide strategies to reinvent educational methods that engage students.

KEYWORDS PowerPoint--Interactive Nursing Education--Student Engagement

**********

Nurse educators in academic settings find themselves competing with the many technological innovations available to millennium learners. With access to a plethora of social media, a static PowerPoint[R] presentation may leave today's university students unmotivated and disinterested (Berk, 2011). Although nurse faculty often rely on lectures guided by PowerPoint presentations, the quality of these presentations is rarely evaluated. A PowerPoint presentation is an easy-to-use educational tool, but as with any educational method it is only as effective as the presenter who has designed the slides.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2014), the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2008), and the National League for Nursing (2012) have challenged nurse educators to evaluate educational practices in schools of nursing. The time has come to examine current educational methods and identify best educational practices that contribute to a high quality nursing curriculum. The call for the intentional use of active, collaborative, and multifaceted learning strategies supports the need for applying new teaching and learning techniques that are grounded in evidence.

BACKGROUND

Developing high quality curricula requires the integration of many factors, one being the application of proven teaching strategies. Nurse educators support evidence-based practices in nursing care, yet they sometimes fall short in their ability to recognize best educational practices when constructing classroom PowerPoint presentations.

A 2011 survey by the IBOPE Zogby International research group found that PowerPoint presentations rank among the most dreaded presentation platforms. Adult respondents claimed they would rather forego "sex tonight" (24 percent), do their taxes (21 percent), go to the dentist (20 percent), or work on Saturday (18 percent) than have a close encounter with a PowerPoint presentation (Allen, 2011). College students have also been found to have negative reactions toward traditional PowerPoint presentations in their classes (Mann & Robinson, 2009).

Schools of nursing are in an ideal position to encourage, foster, and support transformative educational strategies by applying best educational practices to meet positive student learning outcomes and create a rich, engaging learning environment for students. However, nurse faculty often have the task of conveying complex ideas in a short amount of time and struggle to fit sufficient detail into each class. The result can be the production of PowerPoint presentations with too much information and extensive, detailed explanations, graphs, and charts. It is important to note that reading verbatim decreases learning retention and violates principles of cognitive load theory (Mayer & Johnson, 2008), and that text overload has been identified as a common problem in PowerPoint construction (Kalyuga, 2011; Kirschner, Kester, & Corbalan, 2011; Mayer, 2009).

The NLN Excellence in Nursing Education framework postulates that interactive teaching strategies, as part of a student-centered learning environment, promote effective learning outcomes (Speakman, 2009). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.