Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Onnasch, Ernst-Otto and Ben Schomakers. Proclus: Theologische Grundlegung

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Onnasch, Ernst-Otto and Ben Schomakers. Proclus: Theologische Grundlegung

Article excerpt

ONNASCH, Ernst-Otto and Ben Schomakers. Proclus: Theologische Grundlegung. Hamburg: Meiner, 2015. 124 pp.--Proclus (410-485 C.E.) brought the Athenian academy to new heights in the fifth century C.E. by reinterpreting classical Greek thought in a Neoplatonic and Christian theological environment. The book has an extensive Einleitung in four parts: first, Proclus's life and deeds; second, his position within Neoplatonism; third, form, title, and dates of the book; and fourth, an outline of the basic thought of the work under the title "Metaphysical Modifications." The Einleitung ends in a brief bibliography of editions and translations plus "remarks on secondary literature," which in turn is followed by "Editorial Issues." The extensive Anmerkungen, that is, the notes, follow the bilingual, Greek-German text, and contain notes and commentaries following the text. The book ends in a very helpful and extensive "terminological index and translation key" intended to help broaden and deepen understanding of key Greek words. There are no other indices, neither of names nor of subjects.

The dominant Greek-English text today is still that of Eric Robertson Dodds, Proclus, The Elements of Theology: A Revised Text with Translation, Introduction and Commentary (Oxford University Press, 1933, 2nd ed., 1962). This volume is basic to any modern reading of Proclus's main work, as is this new edition by Onnasch and Schomakers.

Medieval editions and translations into Latin of Proclus's Elements have influenced the new Greek-German text reviewed here to a far greater extent than Dodds's edition. An English-language translation and edition of the twelfth-century Georgian version by the Georgian Ioane Petrizi is planned by Prof. Dr. Levan Gignineisvhili of Tiflis, Georgia. The editors of our present volume consulted Gignineisvhili in Tiflis extensively during the preparation of their new text and came to these conclusions: Dodds's text varies significantly through the absence of the perspective of the twelfth-century Petrizi edition of Proclus's work. Dodds's edition does take note of the rendition in Latin by Wilhelm von Moerbeke, Proclos. Elementatiio theologicc, translate a Guillelmo de Morbecca edited by Helmut Boese (Leuven, 1987), but the edition reviewed here leans on Moerbeke more heavily than does Dodds. Dodds conjectures that the Elements was written by Proclus when he was twenty-seven years of age. …

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