Academic journal article Academy of Educational Leadership Journal

A Frame Work for Identifying Factors to Consider When Implementing an Academic Program at a Satellite Campus

Academic journal article Academy of Educational Leadership Journal

A Frame Work for Identifying Factors to Consider When Implementing an Academic Program at a Satellite Campus

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

Institutions of higher education strive to meet market demand for access to a quality education in various formats while attempting to meet the demands of varying demographics of students. The variation in demographics can range from the traditional 18- year-old student who just graduated from high school to the 50-year-old non-traditional working student who always desired to complete a college education. Also included is the 25-year old who started college but had to stop-out due to financial demands, military service, family commitment or poor performance. Some of these needs are met with the utilization of technology. Today's technological instructional delivery methods include offering online courses in various formats including fully online or hybrid/blended, which can be delivered in a synchronous real-time format or asynchronous format for self-pacing purposes. Additionally, the recent popularity in the advent of MOOC's (Massive Online Open Courses) has expanded the interest in online delivery.

However, many universities and students still see the value of the traditional college campus. The most important aspect of the traditional campus incorporates what many students want most, that is, to interact face to face with their college professor and fellow classmates. Among the reasons cited for creating satellite campuses are to accommodate increased student enrolment and due to a community's desire for campuses closer to home (Bassett, 2011). Many areas of the United State are vastly rural with ever changing landscapes that rely on proximity to metropolitan areas or having institutions of higher However, many universities and students still see the value of the traditional college campus. The most important aspect of the traditional campus incorporates what many students want most, that is, to interact face to face with their college professor and fellow classmates. Among the reasons cited for creating satellite campuses are to accommodate increased student enrolment and due to a community's desire for campuses closer to home (Bassett, 2011). Many areas of the United State are vastly rural with ever changing landscapes that rely on proximity to metropolitan areas or having institutions of higher education nearby. Many universities have created satellite campuses in areas to meet that demand. Allison and Ever sole (2008) argued that for university campuses to take on the catalyst role of expanding the reach of program offerings to satellite locations, they must move beyond the limitations of their current "engagement" approaches.

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for making the decision to launch an academic degree program at a satellite location. The remaining sections of the paper are as follows: the next section will explain the context and background of the case analysis, the following section will provide an explanation of the framework and how the framework is utilized in the case analysis, and the final section will summarize and conclude the paper.

CONTEXT

In the fall of 2009, Kennesaw State University embarked on responding to higher educational demands of one of the fastest growing, yet underserved by higher education, counties in the state of Georgia. At the time of the creation of the partnership with Georgia Highlands College, Kennesaw State University enrolled more than 22,000 students and is categorized as comprehensive university. Georgia Highlands College was a two-year college with more than 4,000 students. Both institutions are part of the University System of Georgia. The site, the former Paulding County, Georgia courthouse and an adjacent county-owned building, was donated to Kennesaw State University and Georgia Highlands College in 2007 after a University System of Georgia Board of Regents' survey concluded that cooperative efforts between two- and four-year USG institutions would best address the state's needs for new academic programs in growing, underserved areas like Paulding County (McGahee, 2012). …

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