Academic journal article Exceptional Children

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Academic journal article Exceptional Children

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Article excerpt

In this, the final issue of Volume 84, we are pleased to publish six original research articles that examine diverse issues in special education and disability. All of these articles were originally accepted under the editorship of our predecessors, Tom Scruggs and Margo Mastropieri. We hope readers will find these articles enlightening and informative.

Boardman, Vaughn, Buckley, Reutebuch, Roberts, and Klingner compared collaborative strategic reading (CSR), which includes multicomponent reading comprehension strategy instruction, to instruction that fourth-and fifth-grade students usually receive. They found that students with learning disabilities (LD) had higher scores on reading comprehension standardized tests than those in the control condition. Although CSR did not help or hinder the comprehension of students who did not have disabilities, it differentially improved results for students with LD.

Wanzek, Swanson, Vaughn, Roberts, and Fall examined an instructional package for helping students identified as having disabilities (LD, intellectual disability [ID], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and speech or language impairments), which included English learners. They found that when teachers employed the package Promoting Adolescent Comprehension Through Text in their eighth-grade social studies classrooms, students with disabilities had significantly better content acquisition.

King, Lemons, and Davidson documented practices that promote beneficial outcomes for students with ASD in their literature review of math interventions. Although no interventions met the standards for evidence-based practices, the authors identified aspects of instructional techniques, mechanisms, and targets that provide guidance for practice and research.

Cannella-Malone, Miller, Schaefer, Jimenez, Page, and Sabielny studied whether video could be used to prompt students with significant disabilities to engage in leisure activities. …

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