Academic journal article Educational Technology & Society

Web-Based Learning System for Developing and Assessing Clinical Diagnostic Skills for Dermatology Residency Program

Academic journal article Educational Technology & Society

Web-Based Learning System for Developing and Assessing Clinical Diagnostic Skills for Dermatology Residency Program

Article excerpt

Introduction

As information and communication technology rapidly evolves and matures, computer-based learning and webbased learning are being replaced with mobile learning approaches (Chen et al., 2005). Holzinger et al. (2005) created mobile interactive learning objects that run on mobile phones to enable medical staff and students to access information quickly and conveniently. The main role of the student has evolved from a passive receiver of knowledge to an active learner, and the role of the educator has shifted from a teacher of students to a facilitator in acquiring knowledge and in improving learning skills (Albarrak, 2010). That is, the learning context has shifted from a teacher-centered model to a learner-centered model in which learning motivation and interaction are higher than ever (Hu et al., 2008).

One form of e-learning is web-based learning, in which learning materials for a given purpose are delivered to students via the Internet (Hsu, 2004). One example is APoMT, a technology-based modeling tool developed by Wu et al. (2010). By applying scaffolding theory and recommended guidelines, APoMT assists students in performing scientific modeling. Wu et al. (2010) showed that APoMT effectively supports the construction of conceptual understanding and learning performance in students who use the tool. Hsu et al. (2008) developed an e-learning platform to teach 75 high school students how the varying distance between the sun and the earth affects the weather during each season. Their findings showed that the platform effectively helped students to model science concepts. Various e-learning platforms have also been used in medical education courses. For example, Bogoch et al. (2012) used a physical examination blog as a tool for enhancing and supplementing evidence-based classes in bedside physical examination. Notably, 77% of the students agreed that, because the blog included an evidence-based component, it was a helpful or very helpful supplement to traditional classes in bedside physical examination. Additionally, 73% agreed that the blog was helpful or very helpful for learning how to perform a physical examination. Fraser et al. (2011) investigated the e-learning attitudes of 117 otolaryngology trainees. Their survey indicated that most of the trainees had been exposed to e-learning throughout their training, and, for most trainees, current self-rated computer literacy was high. Finn (2010) investigated the use of e-learning for teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to medical students. A survey of the students indicated that most agreed that the e-learning platform enhanced their understanding of CPR concepts and substantially increased their learning motivation. In Harrison et al. (2013), a website was used to deliver feedback about the objective structural clinical examination (OSCE) to clarify how students engage with various forms of feedback in this context. The study showed that students who performed well on the OSCE viewed significantly more web pages compared to students who performed poorly. Marshall et al. (2011) established and evaluated an e-learning platform for teaching medical students when a radiologic examination should be ordered. The results showed that the platform significantly improved the quality of radiologic examination orders, especially in terms of logistics and radiation safety. Another study of medical students by O'Leary and Janson (2010) investigated whether simulations delivered by an e-learning system improve performance in pediatric resuscitation. The research findings showed that the simulations significantly improved both the knowledge and competence of medical students in performing pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A study by O'Neill et al. (2011) developed a web-based infection prevention and control program for medical students. The 517 medical students who participated in the study showed statistically significant improvements in their knowledge after completing two modules. …

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