Academic journal article Journal of Eating Disorders

Binge Eating, Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors in Participants of the ELSA-Brazil

Academic journal article Journal of Eating Disorders

Binge Eating, Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors in Participants of the ELSA-Brazil

Article excerpt

Author(s): Thamyres Souza da Silva[sup.1], Maria Del Carmen Bisi Molina[sup.1], Maria Angnlica Antunes Nunes[sup.2], Carolina Perim de Faria[sup.1] and Nagela ValadA[pounds sterling]o Cade[sup.1]

Background

Binge eating is a behaviour characterised by exaggerated food ingestion over a short period of time, followed by a sense of loss of control over the amounts eaten [1-4]. Binge eating behaviour occurs as a central symptom of eating disorders such as binge eating disorder (BED) bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa or as sporadic, a partial behavior when they do not meet all the diagnostic criteria for the disorder, but it can bring discomfort and seeking treatment because of the recurrent binge eating episodes [2, 3].

Studies performed among the Brazilian population have reported the prevalence of recurrent binge eating episodes to range from 12.8 % in the general population over 18 years [5], 24.6 % in teenagers, with girls presenting a higher prevalence than boys (31 %) [6] and up to 39.3 % in overweight adults [7].A study performed by Hood et al. found a prevalence of recurrent binge eating episodes of 33 % among obese adults, which was similar to the Brazilian studies [8]. Although different methods of assessment have been used, generally similar prevalences of recurrent binge eating episodes are reported worldwide in obese and general population groups [9-11].

Individuals with recurrent binge eating episodes or BED present with higher levels of caloric consumption [12] and cravings (abnormal food desires) [13]. Other factors not diet-related that are associated with BED include higher alcohol consumption [6, 14], lower physical activity [6, 15], anxiety and depression [16] and health conditions such as diabetes and hypertension [17].

The goal of the present study was to investigate the frequency of recurrent binge eating episodes and their relationship with nutritional profiles, eating profiles and selected lifestyle factors in a cohort of 15,105 public servants aged between 35 and 74 years old from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (Estudo Longitudinal da Saude do Adulto - ELSA-Brazil). The present study is important because few studies have investigated the prevalence of recurrent binge eating episodes and related risk factors in adult, aging populations and in the non-obese [5, 8, 9, 11, 16, 18, 19].

Method

Design and participants

This cross sectional observational study used baseline data from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brazil) [20]. The sample consisted of 15,105 public servants from six higher education institutions, active or retired, aged between 35 and 74 years old, who participated in the first stage of data collection of ELSA-Brazil, which ended in 2010.

The outcome variable was the presence of recurrent binge eating episodes, and the exposure variables included sociodemographic (sex, age, self-reported race/ethnicity, level of education and income per capita), nutritional (total calories and calories per food group), weight (body mass index [BMI]), and other lifestyle (smoking, alcohol and physical activity) factors. In Brazil, due to a wide variety of mixed national and ethnic groups in the population, race/ethnicity is categorised using self-reported skin color of black, brown, white, yellow (Asian) or red (indigenous).

Assessments

Recurrent binge eating episodes evaluation was based on the DSM IV [3] definition as in the following question: "Some people, in some occasions, eat large amounts of food at once, over a short period of time (up to 2 hours). They feel that they have lost control, that is, they cannot avoid starting to eat, and after they start, they cannot stop. Over the past six months, how frequently did you eat in this way?" recurrent binge eating episodes were considered present when a participant reported that this type of overeating occurred twice or more a week over the previous six months. …

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