Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Theoretical Modelling to Explain Lecturers' Use of Educational Support Systems for Teaching in University-Based Library Schools in Nigeria: Extending the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Theoretical Modelling to Explain Lecturers' Use of Educational Support Systems for Teaching in University-Based Library Schools in Nigeria: Extending the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

Article excerpt

Lecturers' use of educational support systems for teaching: a global perspective

Educational support systems (ESS) are information, communication and telecommunication technologies, hardware and equipment that are deployed for instructional purposes. They work with the aid of software installed either at the factory, point of sale or use. They are used in institutions of higher learning all over the world as tools to support the educational objectives of teaching, learning and research. They provide and help in developing skills for educational activities such as searching and assessing information, cooperation, communication, problem solving and lifelong learning which are important for the preparation of students for the knowledge society (Drent and Meelissen, 2008; Afshari, Abu Bakar, Su Luan, Abu Samah and Say Fooi (2009). The use of ESS for teaching is one of the new learning trends that challenge the banking concept of education (that is, the assumption that the teacher owns the knowledge and deposits it into the students who attend the class).

The change from teacher-centered education system to learner-centered education the world over in the past few years also contribute to the use of technology in tertiary education. This use enables equal access, quality education and equips new generations of learners with enhanced skills to operate in the 21st century where technology is construed as a resource to help students in developing higher order thinking, creativity and research skills (Ringstaff and Kelley, 2002; Inwent, 2004; Tella, Tella, Toyobo, Adika and Adeyinka (2007). Technology integration in tertiary education, according to Dias and Atkinson (2001), has covered the continuum from instruction on programming skills, self-directed drill and practice, interactive learning software, online training, testing, instructional delivery augmentation, and Internet-based accessibility to information, communication and publication. This integration is driven primarily by hardware and software evolution, accessibility to computers in educational settings and popular instructional technology trends. Nowadays, there are educational support software and administrative packages which can generate and store student records; schedule classes through e-mails and word processing, and design teacher tools like computerized grade books, test worksheets and examination and curriculum templates (Onyebinama, 2007).

ESS promote conducive teaching and learning environments in tertiary education and have been shown to have positive impact on the learning environment and students generally. Educators in tertiary institutions can use multimedia to teach interactively and work on class projects. They can communicate and do research with the use of the Internet. ESS allow educators to have more control over their teaching, to analyze problem critically and to collaborate. This involves the instructional use of information processing and productivity software like word processors, databases creator and manager, spreadsheets, presentation programs, multimedia authoring tools, e-mail, video production equipment, digital reference materials, electronic indexes and network search engines.

ESS have great potential to increase access to knowledge. This is because access to computers and the Internet has increased the ability of educators to carry out more research which has led to improved quality of teaching and instruction. ESS has also provided opportunities to establish contact, cooperate, and maintain beneficial relationships with other educators of similar interests across the world. It has broadened the course of analysis and research and improved the quality of work with the opportunity for diverse views (from experts and other colleagues) acquired over increasingly short periods of time.

Kumar, Che Rose and D'Silva (2008) opined that the use of ESS in the classroom will, no doubt, inspire the teachers to approach their tasks with a greater sense of purpose and, more importantly, a sense of play, to make the learning process fun for students. …

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