Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

South Carolina State College Historic District (Orangeburg Movement, Orangeburg Massacre)

Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

South Carolina State College Historic District (Orangeburg Movement, Orangeburg Massacre)

Article excerpt

Students at this African American college organized sit-ins that contributed to the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964. Four years later, they led protests resulting in "The Orangeburg Massacre," which pointed out that passage of the Act was not the end of the struggle. Today the "South Carolina State College Historic District" is the core of the historic campus at South Carolina State University. The district consists of ten brick Classical Revival style academic buildings constructed between 1917 and 1969, which housed classrooms, laboratories, the library, offices, and the law school. The district also includes a 1920s landscaped square with a 1969 monument erected and dedicated to the memory of three students who lost their lives in the Orangeburg Massacre of February 8, 1968.

Orangeburg, South Carolina, was one of 40 cities that experienced student protests in March 1960. After several weeks of unsuccessful protests at city lunch counters, South Carolina State's Charles McDew led 1,000 marchers downtown. Police, firemen, and state troopers intercepted the students, firing tear gas and full-pressure water hoses into the crowd. Police arrested nearly 400 students. Like the Birmingham Campaign a few months earlier, Orangeburg's mass movement focused on desegregating public facilities. …

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