Academic journal article International Journal of Yoga

Effects of 6 Months Yoga Program on Renal Functions and Quality of Life in Patients Suffering from Chronic Kidney Disease

Academic journal article International Journal of Yoga

Effects of 6 Months Yoga Program on Renal Functions and Quality of Life in Patients Suffering from Chronic Kidney Disease

Article excerpt

Byline: Rajendra. Pandey, Tung. Arya, Amit. Kumar, Ashish. Yadav

Aim: To study the effect of 6 months yoga program in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients with CKD were studied and divided into two groups (yoga group and control group) to see the effect of yoga in CKD. Patients in the yoga group were offered yoga therapy along with other conventional treatment modalities, while the control group was only on conventional treatment. Subjects in yoga group were trained to perform specific yogic asanas for at least 5 days a week for 40-60 min a day. Regular monitoring of blood pressure, renal function, requirement of a number of dialysis, and quality of life (QOL) indicators were done. Fifty patients (yoga - 25; control-25) completed 6 months follow-up. Results: In yoga group, a significant reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, significant reduction in blood urea and serum creatinine levels, and significant improvement in physical and psychological domain of the World Health Organization QOL (as assessed by BREF QOL scores) were seen after 6 months. In control group, rise of blood pressure, deterioration of renal function, and QOL were observed. Poststudy comparison between the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction of blood pressure, nonsignificant reduction in blood urea and serum creatinine, and significant improvement in physical and psychological domain of QOL in yoga group as compared to control group. For subjects in yoga group, the need for dialysis was less when compared to control group although this difference was statistically insignificant. Except for inability of some patients to perform certain yogic asanas no adverse effect was found in the study. Conclusion: Six months yoga program is safe and effective as an adjuvant therapy in improving renal functions and QOL of CKD patients.

Introduction

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increasingly been recognized as emerging health problem in India. The major contributory factors leading to the development of CKD are diabetes and hypertension. [sup][1] In Canada, 1.9-2.3 million people have CKD. [sup][2] The U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that CKD affected an estimated 16.8% of the U.S adults aged 20 years and older, during 1999-2004. [sup][3] The UK estimates suggest that 6% of men and 7% of women have sympatomatic CKD. [sup][4] In Indian scenario, the prevalence is increasing although the exact figures vary among different studies. In a study by Singh et al ., [sup][5] the prevalence of CKD taking both decreased GFR and proteinuria into consideration was found to be 4.2% by modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) criteria and 13.3% by Cockcroft-Gault equation corrected to the body surface area (CG-BSA) while it was found to be 6.3% by MDRD criteria and 16.69% by CG-BSA in results from kidney disease screening project. [sup][6] Management of CKD includes management of its complications such as fluid retention, electrolyte imbalance, metabolic acidosis, bone disease, anemia, and cardiovascular abnormalities. In end-stage renal disease, kidney function can only be replaced by dialysis or by a kidney transplant. Dialysis is not a permanent cure as the patient requires it regularly. Kidney transplantation offers the best outcomes and quality of life (QOL). However, not every candidate is suited for kidney transplantation. Patients with immunocompromised state and those having HIV or active hepatitis were not considered for transplantation because of increased risk of opportunistic infections. The presence of potentially harmful antibody against the donor's kidney is another absolute contraindication to transplant. These include natural antibodies against ABO blood group antigens and antibodies against human leukocyte antigen. [sup][7],[8]

All these therapeutic modalities are expensive and beyond the reach of majority of patients in India. …

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