Academic journal article Style

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Style

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

To the readers of Style,

I want to take a brief moment of your time to tell you about this issue (50.4) of Style, our fourth occasional issue that includes a "Target Essay," written and guest-edited by international experts in the study of literature. For the current issue, our guest editor is Professor Brian Richardson, who needs no introduction to narratologists, and whose work was initially coordinated with the contributions of Professors Jan Alber, Henrik Skov Nielsen, and Stefan Iversen; however, after some stimulating debate, each of the three decided to contribute his own slightly longer writings than other responses rather than coauthor a single Target Essay The basic problems to be addressed in this issue of Style: "all four are working against what they perceive to be a mimetic bias in narrative theory and are instead trying to formulate concepts that can effectively encompass a wider range of narratives, especially anti-mimetic ones." In his Target Essay, Richardson has labeled this collection of concepts as "unnatural narrative theory" and writes that

unnatural fiction is different not only from mimetic fiction but also what I call non-mimetic or non-natural fiction. Non-mimetic narratives include conventional fairy tales, animal fables, ghost stories, and other kinds of fiction that invokes magical or supernatural elements. …

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