Academic journal article The Qualitative Report

Why Teacher Education? Documenting Undocumented Female Student Teachers' Motives in Indonesia: A Case Study

Academic journal article The Qualitative Report

Why Teacher Education? Documenting Undocumented Female Student Teachers' Motives in Indonesia: A Case Study

Article excerpt

The purpose of this paper, within the altruistic, intrinsic, or extrinsic motives framework, was to report the qualitative findings on the undocumented motives of English as a foreign language (EFL) female student teachers to become a teacher by choosing a teacher education program at one public university in Jambi, Sumatra, Indonesia. The data were collected through demographic profiles and semi-structured in-depth interviews with 21 EFL female student teachers. Whereas personal interests and aptitudes undoubtedly act an important role to embark on a journey to become a teacher, our findings indicated that the female student teachers' desire to enter a teacher education program was driven by a strong mixing of altruistic motives (idealistic and social mission such as helping society become better in future, helping rural and remote areas, shaping future educated generation, and loving to work with young generation), intrinsic motives (intellectual mission, role models' continuation, and personal fulfillment), and extrinsic motives (compatible work schedules and a hero status at school and in society). Implications and suggestions for future research are also discussed. Keywords: Motives, Indonesian Female Student Teachers, Qualitative Case Study

Teachers are vital to school improvement efforts and teachers are responsible for raising the quality of learning for all students as teachers were in day-to-day contacts with the students who potentially develop the succeeding generation of teachers (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] (2005). Additionally, Lortie (1975) argued that any job or occupation, which failed in recruiting new quality entrants, would fail to remain. Consequently, teacher profession should recruit and be filled in by highly-motivated and competent candidates and understanding candidates' initial motives to pursue teaching credentials in a teacher education program is indispensible as a foundation to develop teacher education policies before, during, and after entering the program.

Teaching profession has become as a career choice among Indonesian young people over the past few years. For example, of 305.956 students studying at Indonesian Open University in the 2015-2016 academic year, 225.716 were student teachers (Indonesian Open University, 2015). The continuous increase in the number of student teachers has indicated that teaching profession has been able to attract young people's interest. However, the increase in the number of student teachers studying at teacher education programs has raised questions: Is the increase driven by the fact that the central and local governments have offered an attractive reward through salary increases for teaching profession? Is the increase pushed by the motives that Indonesian young people want to improve the quality of schools and students in order to face the economic and social changes in Indonesia and in the world? Is it because Indonesian young people must take a teacher education program in order to begin the process of realizing their intended career path? Or is it for the reason that teacher profession is a woman's job? It is vital to know what motives determine Indonesian student teachers to major in teacher education program as Indonesian student teachers' motives have not been documented in the previous studies. Particularly, through this study, it is important to find out how Indonesian student teachers consider teacher education programs among other program choices. What specific motives have driven them to choose teacher education programs?

A number of previous studies have examined individuals' altruistic, intrinsic, and extrinsic motives to become a teacher through entering teacher education programs. In terms of altruistic motives, there are a variety of motives including "I love to work with children," "I want to shape future of children," "I want to enhance social equity," or "I have a desire to contribute to society. …

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