Academic journal article Phi Delta Kappan

Real Confusion about Fake News

Academic journal article Phi Delta Kappan

Real Confusion about Fake News

Article excerpt

Many students have no idea how to judge the credibility of online news sources, according to findings from an 18-month study of how students read the news.

"Overall, young people's ability to reason about the information on the Internet can be summed up in one word: bleak," said researchers from Stanford University's History Education Group, which studied nearly 7,800 students in 12 states.

"Our 'digital natives' may be able to flit between Facebook and Twitter while simultaneously uploading a selfie to Instagram and texting a friend, but when it comes to evaluating information that flows through social media channels, they are easily duped ... [W]e would hope that middle school students could distinguish an ad from a news story. By high school, we would hope that students reading about gun laws would notice that a chart came from a gun owners' political action committee. And, in 2016, we would hope college students, who spend hours each day online, would look beyond a .org URL and ask who's behind a site that presents only one side of a contentious issue. But in every case and at every level, we were taken aback by students' lack of preparation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.