Academic journal article Comparative Drama

1616: Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu's China

Academic journal article Comparative Drama

1616: Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu's China

Article excerpt

Tian Yuan Tan, Paul Edmonson, and Shih-pe Wang, eds. 1616: Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu's China. London: Bloomsbury, 2016. Pp. xxii + 326. $29.95 paper, $114 cloth.

This volume begins with a list of illustrations (viii), a list of contributors (ix-xvii), acknowledgments (xviii), a foreword by Wilt L. Idema (xix-xxii), and an introduction by the editors (1-4). The primary text includes essays in ten parts. Part 1, "Setting the Scene: Playwrights and Localities," includes: Yongming Xu, "The Backdrop of Regional Theatre to Tang Xianzu's Drama" (5-19); Paul Edmonson, "Stratford-upon-Avon: 1616" (20-34). Part 2, "Classics, Tastes, and Popularity," includes: Wei Hua, "The 'popular turn in the Elite Theatre of the Ming after Tang Xianzu: Love, Dream and Deaths in The Tale of the West Loft" (36-48); Nick Walton, "Blockbusters and Popular Stories" (49-62). Part 3, "Making History," includes: Ayling Wang, "Shishiju as Public Forum: The Crying Phoenix and the Dramatization of Contemporary Political Affairs in Late Ming China" (64-75); Helen Cooper, "Dramatizing the Tudors" (76-94). Part 4, "The State and the Theatre," includes: Tian Yuan Tan, "Sixty Plays from the Ming Palace, 1615-18" (96-107); Janet Clare, "Licensing the King's Men: From Court Revels to Public Performance," (108-20). Part 5, "The Circulation of Dramatic Texts and Printing," includes: Stephen H. West, "Tired, Sick, and Looking for Money: Zang Maoxun in 1616" (123-34); Jason Scott-Warren, "Status Anxiety: Arguing About Plays and Print in Early Modern London" (135-48). …

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