Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Editor's Corner:

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Editor's Corner:

Article excerpt

New Tools--New Possibilities

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

It is not news that the modern world is awash in technology. Today's "digital native" students use smartphones and tablets to post on Twitter, Instagram, Flickr, and Tumblr; stay connected with friends via Facebook and text messaging; engage in massive multiplayer online gaming and alternative reality simulations; talk to their GPS navigation systems to find their way to a friend's house or a pizza shop; watch and create YouTube videos; and load up their smartphones with games and apps. The only news here is how commonplace such observations have become.

Technology has changed our world. Our classrooms? Not so much. Students spend most of their daily lives interacting with 2lst-century technology, but in school they must feel as if they have stepped into a time machine, transported back to classrooms that sometimes feel more like the 19th than the 21st century, where smartphone and tablet use is often restricted and technology applications limited. While there are good reasons for schools to be conservative--we don't want to latch on to the latest gadget or instructional fad--modern technology has the potential to transform education through collaborative online environments; cloud computing; game-based learning; interactive simulations; personal learning environments; visualization and modeling tools; augmented reality devices; 3D printing; online data sets and remote sensing; digital probeware; and a wealth of educational activities, tutorials, and videos available on the internet. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.