Academic journal article Science Scope

Sea Ice vs. Ice Sheets

Academic journal article Science Scope

Sea Ice vs. Ice Sheets

Article excerpt

Upon first glance at "Investigating Future Climate Scenarios: Who Will Be Affected by Sea-Level Rise?" (Science Scope, December 2012), I was excited by the topic and to see the use of Google Earth for climate science investigations. This is something I've been interested in learning more about for some time, especially new and unique ways to bring this topic into the classroom.

The article begins with a lengthy explanation, citing several sources, about the future of climate change on Earth. The 'Day 1' activity seems pretty straightforward, though a little difficult to follow since there are a number of references to online data that are not readily accessible while reading the article. My main concern with this article comes with some inaccuracies in the information provided. The authors seem to use the terms "sea ice" and "ice sheet" synonymously. This may seem like nitpicking over the correct usage of terms, however, sea ice and ice sheets are fundamentally different, and their melting does not lead to the same consequences, as could be interpreted by reading this article.

The term "Arctic Ocean ice sheet" is inaccurate; it does not exist. The ocean is covered with a layer of sea ice, which fluctuates in coverage area over time. …

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