Academic journal article Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge and Management

Reasons for Poor Acceptance of Web-Based Learning Using an LMS and VLE in GHANA

Academic journal article Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge and Management

Reasons for Poor Acceptance of Web-Based Learning Using an LMS and VLE in GHANA

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

The adoption of web-based learning management systems in higher education has resulted in a new teaching approach globally for over a decade (Pina, 2012). Teaching and learning have taken a new dimension as teachers in tertiary educational institutions across the globe have taken advantage of information technology innovations to deliver lessons and fulfil other important roles as teachers to their students. Georgouli, Skalkidis, and Guerreiro (2008) believe that, notwithstanding the effectiveness of the traditional lecture-style of an institutional method of delivery, the new innovation of using a web-based learning management system is gaining popularity in tertiary institutions.

The paradigm shift in the way education is viewed and delivered through a combination of traditional lecture-style and web-based learning approaches is attributed to a knowledge-based economy (Obisat, Airawashdeh, Altarawneh, & Altarawneh, 2013). Obisat et al. (2013) emphasize that the complexity of the rate of IT innovations in organizations has fueled the demand for web-based learning, since most of the working class would like to keep their work while schooling. An online learning management system provides for two major uses. The first is to use it for distance web-based learning and, secondly, to use it to supplement in-class lectures where lecture notes, assignments, course outline, slides, and videos are posted on the internet. According to OECD (2005) the internet then also became a platform for conducting multiple choice and true or false tests/examinations(Georgouli et al., 2008). Coates, James, and Baldwin (2005) define online management systems as enterprise-wide and internet-based systems, such as the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (MOODLE) and Google Classroom, that integrate a wide range of pedagogical and course administration tools, thereby creating a virtual learning environment where students can access teaching and learning materials, participate in class discussions, and take part in class tests/examinations. They further state that these systems now permeate universities around the world, increasing the virtual dimension of most traditional campus-based institutions.

The shift from an industrial to a knowledge-based economy is increasing the competitive level in businesses through rapid technological changes. This trend has also led to a shortening of business process life cycles, a migration towards integration and the extended enterprise as prominent contributors to the web-based learning value chain (Obisat et al., 2013). There is empirical evidence that some of the core activities that enhance effective academic work in the traditional teaching and learning environments of higher institutions of learning, like group discussion, lecture presentation, class test, assignment submission, feedback, and grading, are easily implemented in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This can be achieved with tools such as Moodle, WebCT, or Blackboard (Ahmad, Edwards, & Tomkinson, 2006; Hong & Walker, 2015).

Web-based learning systems are also implemented in institutions of higher learning to gain competitive advantage resulting in increased enrolment, quicker delivery of teaching and learning materials, faster assessment of students' performance, and many other advantages that fuel the adoption of web-based learning globally (Maina & Nzuki, 2015). However, the adoption of web-based learning management systems is confronted with various challenges, such as inadequate training of lecturers and students, high cost of technology, poor decisions, poor IT infrastructure, and the absence of business and Information Systems strategies in developing countries (Maina & Nzuki, 2015). A significant number of African Universities including the University of Professional Studies of Accra (UPSA) are blending the environments of Web-based learning management systems with the traditional methods of lecturing to provide students with both online and face-to-face learning. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.