Academic journal article Akroterion

The Classical Association of South Africa: February 1983-January 1985

Academic journal article Akroterion

The Classical Association of South Africa: February 1983-January 1985

Article excerpt

Previous articles on the history of the Classical Association of South Africa, based on archival material, covered the period from 1908 to 1983. (1) The present instalment takes this history to the beginning of 1985.

1 Administration, February 1983-January 1985

1.1 General

The Executive Committee dealt with the proposals made at the previous conference: the theme of the next conference, 'Modern theories of literature and ancient texts'; (2) the principle of bilingualism in CASA notices occasioned by the resignation of Dr P Greenhalgh; (3) possible short communications by Honours and MA students; (4) the ways and means of inviting an overseas speaker to the next conference; (5) the possible re-introduction of the concession to student members to register for three years in advance at a reduced membership fee (abolished due to administrative difficulties); (6) a pamphlet with information about the Association; (7) a member of CASA to be co-opted to the Executive with the specific task of tracing all teachers of Latin and Greek and enrol them as members, and advise the Executive and regional committees on ways to involve teachers effectively in the activities of the Association and assist teachers as much as possible in the interest of Latin and Greek; (8) the possible re-introduction of the practice of appointing persons to open the discussions of papers; (9) and speakers to make copies of their papers available beforehand. (10)

The proposals were discussed by Prof L Baumbach (C) and Dr M Matier (S) in Cape Town on 19 April 1983 and by Prof B de Wet (VC) and Dr R Whitaker (T) on 9 May 1983 in Durban. Prof W J Henderson contributed his views after his return from sabbatical in Italy. All agreed that papers were to be invited on the main theme, but that, as in the past, papers on other themes would also be welcome; in addition, two specialists on modern literary theory should be invited to deliver papers, the Executive to make the selection from a list of possible candidates; and offers to read papers to be submitted before April 1984. Important notices should be in both English and Afrikaans, the preliminary notices for the Rhodes conference to alternate between the two languages, and the agenda and minutes to be in both languages; however, the Secretary could use his discretion in the case of individuals who did not know Afrikaans. MA and PhD (rather than Honours) students ought to be encouraged to present short communications on their research, but this is the responsibility of their supervisors and much would depend on the number of papers offered. Regarding having an overseas scholar at the next conference, it was suggested that each university contribute to the costs of such a visit and in return invite the visitor to deliver a lecture at its campus; the UCT Summer School could be approached to include the speaker in its programme and make a contribution; members of the Executive were requested to submit lists and brief curricula vitae of possible speakers to the Secretary. Any pamphlets of information issued by regional branches should be sent to the Secretary for circulation to the Executive in order to check on what is circulated in the name of the Association; the Secretary, in turn, could send an outline of the aims and objectives of CASA to the regional branches (which was duly done). (11) It was felt that the tasks of tracing all teachers of Latin and Greek with a view to enrolment as members of CASA, and involving and assisting teachers were best left to the regional branches. Also, the appointment of a full-time PRO was not justifiable, given the Association's limited budget and amount of work; again, regional branches could handle this. Because of a full programme, persons appointed to introduce discussion of the papers should be asked to limit their comments to one or two questions to stimulate discussion. The suggestion that speakers should make copies of their papers available in advance was deemed impractical; at most, speakers could submit an abstract for acceptance and then make their papers available to the persons introducing the discussion at least a day before presentation. …

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