Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Customer Acceptance of Mobile Banking Services: Use Experience as Moderator

Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Customer Acceptance of Mobile Banking Services: Use Experience as Moderator

Article excerpt

The mobile phone has emerged as one of the most ubiquitous devices now in use. Management personnel of banks and other financial institutions have capitalized on this by introducing a set of products and services that are available through the mobile device (m-banking) with the aim of broadening their client base, enhancing operational efficiency, and growing their market share (Shaikh & Karjaluoto, 2015). Similarly, m-banking provides customers with immediate, convenient, and affordable means of banking. In spite of the benefits associated with the use of m-banking services, its acceptance is not as widespread as the providers had anticipated (Dineshwar & Steven, 2013). Use experience is imperative for the acceptance of information systems (Taylor & Todd, 1995). However, particularly in the developing countries of the African continent, limited empirical research has been conducted on how use experience affects the factors of m-banking acceptance (Pappas, Pateli, Giannakos, & Chrissikopoulos, 2014). To enhance the understanding of the role that use experience plays in the acceptance of m-banking, I used an integrated model to investigate the moderating effect of use experience on the drivers of m-banking acceptance.

Research Model and Hypotheses

Many theories have been put forward to explain users' intention to adopt information technology. Prominent among these are social cognition theory (SCT; Bandura, 1986), the technology acceptance model (Davis, 1989), innovation diffusion theory (Rogers, 1995), and the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003). Of these, it has been found that UTAUT has the highest explanatory power and is capable of explaining about 70% of the variance in behavioral intention (BI) to adopt (Venkatesh et al., 2003).

Performance expectancy and effort expectancy are key factors of the UTAUT that are widely held to influence technology use intention in a variety of technology domains and use contexts (Baptista & Oliveira, 2015; Venkatesh et al., 2003; Wang & Wang, 2010). However, researchers have emphasized that the components of SCT and of the institution-based trust theory (ITT; Zucker, 1986) are critical to explanation of user behavior in electronic commerce environments (Alalwan, Dwivedi, Rana, Lal, & Williams, 2015; Yu, 2015). The conceptual model on which this study is based thus integrates factors from UTAUT (performance expectancy and effort expectancy), SCT (self-efficacy), and ITT (structural assurance) to understand customers' BI toward m-banking use, and I used this model to test the moderating effect of use experience on the relationships among these factors.

Performance Expectancy

Performance expectancy refers to the extent to which customers believe that m-banking makes banking easier, more efficient, and more convenient (Venkatesh et al., 2003). Customers are likely to develop a positive intention to use a system that is perceived to be beneficial to their job performance (Baptista & Oliveira, 2015; Wang & Wang, 2010). Use experience is likely to moderate the effect of performance expectancy on BI as performance expectancy will differ between users and nonusers of m-banking. Accordingly, the following hypotheses were therefore proposed:

Hypothesis 1a: Performance expectancy will have a significant positive effect on customers' behavioral intention to use m-banking services.

Hypothesis 1b: Use experience will significantly moderate the relationship between customers' performance expectancy and their behavioral intention to use m-banking services.

Effort Expectancy

Effort expectancy refers to the extent to which customers believe m-banking does not require physical and mental effort (Venkatesh et al., 2003). Customers who perceive m-banking to be effortless are likely to develop a positive BI toward its use (Baptista & Oliveira, 2015). …

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