Academic journal article Parameters

From the Editor

Academic journal article Parameters

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Our Spring issue opens with a forum considering the strategic implications of Mission Command. Anthony King's article, "Mission Command 2.0: From an Individualist to a Collectivist Model," describes how mission command has evolved to facilitate synchronizing the decisions of key leaders. King uses the leadership models of Generals James Mattis and Stanley McChrystal to illustrate his case. Russell Glenn's contribudon, "Mission Command in the Australian Army: A Contrast in Detail," points out the general similarities but subtle differences between the American and Australian models, and what they might mean for cooperation between the two in multinational operations. Thomas-Durell Young's essay, "Legacy Concepts: A Sociology of Command in Central and Eastern Europe," raises important questions regarding the incompatibility of Western notions of mission command with the "legacy concepts" that still dominate the leadership styles of several formerly Communist countries. As NATO develops ways to address Russian adventurism, it would do well to consider the possible effects of asymmetries in the command philosophies of some of its recently added members on its courses of action.

The second forum, After 15 Years of Conflict, offers critical insights into the ways the United States has conducted military interventions thus far in the twenty-first century. The first contribution, Charlotte Blatt's "Operational Success, Strategic Failure: Assessing the 2007 Iraq Troop Surge" compares two perspectives on the outcomes of the troop surge and identifies essential strategy decisions that significantly affected the region's stability. …

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