Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Student Lab Manual for Argument-Driven Inquiry in Physics, Volume 1

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Student Lab Manual for Argument-Driven Inquiry in Physics, Volume 1

Article excerpt

Student Lab Manual for Argument-Driven Inquiry in Physics, Volume 1 By Victor Sampson. $19.95. 249 pp. NSTA Press. Arlington, VA. 2017. ISBN: 9781681405797.

This book is a companion volume for the textbook, Argument--Driven Inquiry in Physics, Volume 1. This lab manual complements the book and provides specific methodology for helping students go beyond the rote learning often associated with physics.

Ideas that were introduced in the textbook are emphasized in the laboratory manual. Each lab generally mirrors the Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) format described in the text book, though there have been a few modifications and additions. Specifically, the lab manual uses steps of:

1. Introduction and lab handout.

2. Task specifics.

3. Materials

4. Safety.

5. Determining whether an investigation proposal is needed.

6. Getting started.

7. Connection to the nature of scientific knowledge and inquiry.

8. Initial argument.

9. Argumentation session.

10. Report (using double-blind peer reviews).

11. Check-out questions.

By following these steps used in each of the labs, a student will become familiar and comfortable with the processes related to real science. Real science is probably nowhere more evident than in the double-blind peer review. Here, students bounce their ideas off peers and write rough drafts of a report without it being graded by the teacher. Only when all the feedback is received does the final report get written and then submitted for a grade.

Labs used in the manual are not "cookie cutter" in nature because the students are presented with the opportunity of making some choices and having options. They can decide which data to collect and generally how to collect it. Some guiding questions are provided, but there is a good deal of autonomy, just as an adult scientist might have.

One intriguing aspect is the idea of argumentation. As students mimic a scientific conference with poster sessions, they go from lab station to lab station and critique, challenge, and praise the work that has been done. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.