Academic journal article WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship

From the Editor

Academic journal article WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship

From the Editor

Article excerpt

This WLN issue focuses on four groups in writing centers: tutors, grad students, speakers of English with differing levels of proficiency, and classroom tutors. Susan Dinitz' article starts the conversation by focusing on critically important threshold concepts in writing and the misperceptions tutors may harbor if they don't fully grasp these concepts--misperceptions that can lead to ineffective tutoring. Noting that threshold concepts are very difficult to teach, Dinitz shares with us writing projects she assigns to help new tutors experience and enact some of these concepts. Next, Chuck Radke's article describes the formation of a graduate writing center at a time before there was extensive scholarship on graduate writing centers to guide them. Radke offers a compelling rationale for why a graduate writing center needs "a room of its own" where the graduate writers are the experts and the consultants are their personal trainers.

In addition to graduate students, another group seeking writing center tutorials are those whose English proficiency varies: non-native speakers of English, Generation 1.5, and native speakers of English. …

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