Academic journal article Style

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Style

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

To the readers of Style,

I want to call your attention to and tell you about this double issue of Style (52.1-2), our fifth occasional issue that includes a target essay (TE), written and guest-edited by international experts in the study of literature. For the current issue, our guest editor is Prof. James Phelan, who, as the saying goes, needs no introduction to narratologists. I have been personally following Jim's work since 1989-90 when he first published an essay in Style (24.3) on Virginia Woolf's The Waves. Using his thinking about literary character and his narrative models from Reading People, Reading Plots (1989) and his later books in my literary pedagogy classes, I have been a fan of his ever since.

The basic problems to be addressed in this issue of Style revolve around the continued influence of Seymour Chatman's narratological model as discussed in his influential Story and Discourse (1978). Phelan begins by revisiting Chatman's model "from a theoretical perspective," and by posing several questions to be answered: "Where are the characters? Do they sometimes function as tellers? Why are they not explicitly present [in Chatman's model]? What would happen if one tried to make them present?" (TE 3). In the target essay, Phelan proposes answers to these many questions, and so we have invited more than twenty-five scholars from across the globe to consider, argue with, and question Phelan's assertions and hypotheses. …

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