Academic journal article Phi Delta Kappan

The Gifted Gap

Academic journal article Phi Delta Kappan

The Gifted Gap

Article excerpt

Although high-poverty schools are just as likely as low-poverty schools to offer some sort of gifted education, the students in low-poverty schools are twice as likely to actually participate in these programs. That's according to a new study from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Fordham's researchers delved into federal data to answer three questions: 1) To what extent do high-poverty schools offer gifted and talented programs? 2) What proportion of students in such schools participates in those programs? 3) How does student participation in those programs vary by race within schools, particularly high-poverty schools?

In addition to showing that only 6.1% of students in high-poverty schools participate in gifted programs (compared to 12.4% in low-poverty schools), the study also reveals that Latino and Black students are underrepresented in these programs. While Black students constitute 15% of the student population, they make up only 10% of those in gifted programs. A similar gap exists for Latino students (27.6% of total population versus 20.8% of those in gifted programs). In contrast, White and Asian students make up a larger proportion of those in gifted programs than they do of the general population. …

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