Academic journal article Science and Children

Answer to Last Month's Frozen Coke

Academic journal article Science and Children

Answer to Last Month's Frozen Coke

Article excerpt

Last month, I had you freeze a couple of plastic bottles of Coke or other carbonated beverage for about three hours, and then open them over a dish. Depending on whether the bottle was frozen lying on its side or standing straight up, a few things could have happened. Either the opened Coke froze into slush as soon as you poured it out into a dish, or it turned to slush immediately and flowed out the top of the bottle before you could do anything else.

When you first open a Coke that hasn't been frozen, there's a hissing sound. That's C[O.sub.2] (carbon dioxide) gas escaping from the liquid. Carbonated beverages are bottled under high pressure, and that high pressure keeps the C[O.sub.2] dissolved in the beverage. When you have a gas dissolved in a liquid, that lowers the freezing point of the liquid. So, if you leave a Coke in the freezer for just a short while, the liquid inside doesn't freeze. If you removed the C[O.sub.2] before putting the Coke in the freezer, the liquid would freeze like an ice cube, but that's not what we've done.

Now you open the top. C[O.sub.2] escapes the liquid, and the liquid begins to freeze, or turn to slush, because without the dissolved C[O. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.