Academic journal article Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law

International Law and the Trump Administration: National and International Security

Academic journal article Proceedings of the Annual Meeting-American Society of International Law

International Law and the Trump Administration: National and International Security

Article excerpt

This panel was convened at 9:00 a.m., Thursday, April 13, 2017, with opening remarks by Lucinda Low, President of the American Society of International Law. Oonagh Fitzgerald of the Centre for International Governance Innovation gave additional welcoming remarks, after which the panel's moderator, Benjamin Wittes of the Brookings Institution, introduced the panelists: Shireen Hunter of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University; John Bellinger of Arnold & Porter Kay Scholer LLP; and Elisa Massimino of Human Rights First.

OPENING REMARKS BY LUCINDA LOW

doi:10.1017/amp.2017.91

This panel was convened at 9:00 a.m., Thursday, April 13, 2017, with opening remarks by Lucinda Low, President of the American Society of International Law. Oonagh Fitzgerald of the Centre for International Governance Innovation gave additional welcoming remarks, after which the panel's moderator, Benjamin Wittes of the Brookings Institution, introduced the panelists: Shireen Hunter of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University; John Bellinger of Arnold & Porter Kay Scholer LLP; and Elisa Massimino of Human Rights First.

When the Annual Meeting Committee began its planning process a year ago, they could not have foreseen the challenges that would confront international law and institutions following the U.S. elections, but both the committee and the Society's leadership felt that it would be important to adjust our plans to take account of this new landscape. And this is taking place throughout this annual meeting and most particularly through the three panels we're hosting at this same time each morning on "International Law and the Trump Administration," and the first panel, as you know, today is on "National and International Security."

These are part of a broader initiative that the Society launched in January as the new administration began its first one hundred days in office, and some of you may have been following a series of live webcasts that we have been organizing, featuring former senior administration officials of both parties, which endeavor to present factual information and informed perspectives on the critical policy choices and international law dimensions that are facing the United States and the world. In fact, one of the members of today's panel, John Bellinger, participated in our inaugural webcast of this series. These webcasts are available to the public without charge and are continuing to draw very large audiences. If you haven't yet tapped into them--and they are free--you can find them at www.ASIL.org/100days.

Now, I'd like to thank the Annual Meeting Committee for this meeting, in particular, Saira Mohamed, for coordinating this session. I'd also like to thank our longtime partners, the Centre for International Governance Innovation, or CG, for their sponsorship of this series. And it's now my pleasure to invite Oonagh Fitzgerald, the Director of CG's International Law Research Program, to make brief remarks. Oonagh.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS BY OONAGH FITZGERALD

doi:10.1017/amp.2017.92

Thanks very much, Lucinda. Good morning, everybody. It's my pleasure to welcome you to this special session on "International Law and the Trump Administration," with a focus on national and international security.

The Centre for International Governance Innovation is a nonpartisan, independent think tank focused on global governance and law, politics, security, and economics. We're based in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and we have fellows all around the world. What we focus on is writing and preparing policy-relevant research on critical issues of international law, mainly focusing on international economic law, environmental law, intellectual property law, and indigenous law.

Now, Canadians have two expressions about America that I'm sure you've heard before and that will be very familiar to Canadians. When America sneezes, Canada and the rest of the world catches a cold, and the other one was by Pierre Elliott Trudeau, who is an earlier prime minister of Canada. …

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